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Quaternity
by Kenneth Mark Hoover


Overview - Before he became a U.S. federal marshal in Haxan, John Marwood rode with a band of killers up and down the Texas/Mexico border. Led by Abram Botis, an apostate from the Old Country, this gang of 13 killers search for the fabled golden city of Cibola, even riding unto the barren, blood-soaked plains of Comancheria.  Read more...

 
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More About Quaternity by Kenneth Mark Hoover
 
 
 
Overview
Before he became a U.S. federal marshal in Haxan, John Marwood rode with a band of killers up and down the Texas/Mexico border. Led by Abram Botis, an apostate from the Old Country, this gang of 13 killers search for the fabled golden city of Cibola, even riding unto the barren, blood-soaked plains of Comancheria.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781771483612
  • ISBN-10: 177148361X
  • Publisher: Chizine Publications
  • Publish Date: March 2015
  • Page Count: 280
  • Reading Level: Ages 16-UP
  • Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.6 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Fantasy - Dark Fantasy
Books > Fiction > Westerns - General
Books > Fiction > Horror - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-08-10
  • Reviewer: Staff

After 2014's brilliantly brutal Haxan, Hoover revisits his nightmarish American West, a blood-soaked wasteland where "land belongs to the man strong enough to take it, and keep it." This prequel of sorts serves as backstory for Haxan's John Marwood, a killer-for-hire roaming the Tex/Mex border. Taking up with the depraved Abram Botis, Marwood finds himself tasked with killing anyone and everyone who stands in the way of land-greedy ranchers. Botis is also obsessed with the mythical golden city of Cibola, and as his warped philosophies shepherd Marwood into acts of unforgivable savagery, the story transforms from a tale of bad men doing bad things into a penetrating exploration of the violence inherent in America's construction and an operatic treatise on "pain and death—a thing indescribable and of no comprehension to any sane man." Readers seeking a simple horse opera should look elsewhere; the depth of Hoover's narrative hews far closer to the moral complexities of Cormac McCarthy than it does the straightforward adventures of Louis L'Amour. A western of blood and violence with a marked lack of redemption tinged with hints of the fantastic, this is a pitch-black western that resonates. (May)

 
BAM Customer Reviews