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The Quickening Maze
by Adam Foulds


Overview - In 1837, after years of struggling with alcoholism and depression, the great nature poet John Clare finds himself in High Beach- a mental institution located in Epping Forest on the outskirts of London. It is not long before another famed writer, the young Alfred Tennyson, moves nearby and grows entwined in the catastrophic schemes of the hospital's owner, the peculiar Dr.  Read more...

 
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Overview

In 1837, after years of struggling with alcoholism and depression, the great nature poet John Clare finds himself in High Beach- a mental institution located in Epping Forest on the outskirts of London. It is not long before another famed writer, the young Alfred Tennyson, moves nearby and grows entwined in the catastrophic schemes of the hospital's owner, the peculiar Dr. Matthew Allen, his lonely adolescent daughter, and a coterie of mysterious local characters. With lyrical grace, the cloistered world of High Beach and its residents are brought richly to life in this enchanting book.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780143117797
  • ISBN-10: 0143117793
  • Publisher: Penguin Books
  • Publish Date: June 2010
  • Page Count: 258
  • Reading Level: Ages 18-UP

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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-05-17
  • Reviewer: Staff

Foulds's erudite, Booker-shortlisted debut follows three men--Dr. Matthew Allen, mad peasant poet John Clare, and prodigious pipe-smoking poet Alfred Tennyson--as their fates intertwine at the High Beach mental institution outside of 1837 London. Worried over the cost of the wedding for his eldest daughter, Matthew invents a machine to mass-produce filigreed wood furniture. Ignoring the asylum for his business pursuits, Matthew seeks investors, including the Tennyson family, of whom Alfred's brother, Septimus, is a patient at High Beach. John, meanwhile, spirals into a fantasy world fueled by his obsession with a dead childhood sweetheart, Mary. Things become complicated when John deludes himself into thinking a fellow patient is his dead love. All the while, Alfred, who is at the asylum to be near his brother, is fruitlessly pursued by Matthew's adolescent daughter, Hannah. While Alfred, unfortunately, is the least convincing character, John's madness is richly imagined, and Matthew comes off as powerfully sympathetic as he grows ever more desperate to raise funds for his business gamble. There's a manneredness to the storytelling that devotees of 19th-century British literature will appreciate. (July)

 
BookPage Reviews

The maze of the human mind

Adam Foulds’ second novel is well named. The Quickening Maze is set mostly in an early Victorian English asylum, a place whose residents’ lives are mazelike in their complexity, even those who are free to leave.

John Clare, a poet destined for a fair-to-middling place in the English canon, has been committed to the asylum, a rural facility run by one Matthew Allen. Clare, whose literary career has stalled, is fixated on a lost childhood sweetheart whom he thinks is his wife. Sometimes he’s lucid; sometimes he thinks himself a famous prizefighter, Lord Byron or Robinson Crusoe. Young Alfred Tennyson is also on the scene, there to be near his brother, an inmate. The two poets’ paths intersect with those of Allen, several of Allen’s daughters and sundry other characters. Clare is eventually freed from the asylum, but not from his illness; Allen is brought low by ill-advised business dealings; Tennyson loses money in said dealings, but ends up, of course, on his way to becoming Lord Tennyson and poet laureate.

The book is divided into seasonal sections, which, along with its rural setting, suggests cyclical time and pastoral life. Some of the characters—certainly Clare—may prefer such a life. But Foulds’ England is becoming an urban and mechanized place. Life there may look like a road to be traveled, but it’s becoming a one-way street, and chances lost do not come again. Allen tries to become an industrialist, which is his ruin. His daughter Hannah fails to win over Tennyson, and ends up with an uninteresting but successful businessman, who, unlike Allen, has grasped such matters as mass production.

Clare is a man and poet of the common lands, where people travel and forage as they please. Unfortunately for Clare and his gypsy friends, the commons are disappearing. Early on, from inside young Clare’s mind, Foulds speaks of nature in language rivaling Clare’s own poetry; Clare’s relation to nature here is intuitive, even magical. But as the commons give way to such things as railroads, intuition gives way to madness. Mad Clare may be, but Foulds allows him his sensibility and an odd intelligence. Foulds writes from inside the minds of his characters, sane and otherwise, with as much empathy and respect as anyone this side of Dostoyevsky.

Clare ends up on the road, lost then found. His road is mazelike. His journey is amazing.

 

 
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