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Rain Reign
by Ann M. Martin


Overview -

A "New York Times" Bestseller

Rose Howard is obsessed with homonyms. She's thrilled that her own name is a homonym, and she purposely gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose's rules of homonyms, is very special.  Read more...


 
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More About Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin
 
 
 
Overview

A "New York Times" Bestseller

Rose Howard is obsessed with homonyms. She's thrilled that her own name is a homonym, and she purposely gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose's rules of homonyms, is very special. Not everyone understands Rose's obsessions, her rules, and the other things that make her different not her teachers, not other kids, and not her single father.

When a storm hits their rural town, rivers overflow, the roads are flooded, and Rain goes missing. Rose's father shouldn't have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search.

Hearts will break and spirits will soar for this powerful story, brilliantly told from Rose's point of view."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780312643003
  • ISBN-10: 0312643004
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
  • Publish Date: October 2014
  • Page Count: 226
  • Reading Level: Ages 9-12


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Themes - Special Needs
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Dogs
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Pets

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-08-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

Rose Howard is a high-functioning autistic fifth-grader, and her preoccupation with homophones, her insistence on rules being followed to the letter of the law, and her difficulties reading social cues and understanding emotions are giving her trouble at school and frustrating her impatient and often angry single father. Rose’s own feelings of anxiety and worry are viscerally felt when her dog, Rain, gets lost after a storm wreaks havoc in her small New York town. As Rose’s sense of order is disrupted by floods, uprooted trees, and destroyed buildings, she methodically follows a plan to bring Rain home, though things don’t go as expected. Newbery Honor author Martin (A Corner of the Universe) is extremely successful in capturing Rose’s perspective and personality; Rose can’t always recognize when she is being treated unkindly (it’s no rare occurrence), but readers will see what she is up against, as well as the efforts of those who reach out to her. Filled with integrity and determination, Rose overcomes significant obstacles in order to do what is right. Ages 9–12. Agent: Amy Berkower, Writers House. (Oct.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Breaking all the rules

BookPage Children's Top Pick, October 2014

Most people don’t think much about homonyms or prime numbers. But most people aren’t 12-year-old Rose Howard, whose every waking moment is spent thinking about just those things. So it’s especially good luck that both her name (Rose/rows) and her dog’s (Rain/reign) are homonyms.

Few people understand Rose, whose OCD and Asperger syndrome make her the odd girl out at school and at home. Her mother left when she was young, so Rose lives with her father, an angry man who can’t deal with her eccentricities. Fortunately, her caring Uncle Weldon is her saving grace throughout the entire story. When Rain goes missing after a storm, Rose’s life changes dramatically. Her routine is disrupted, and her focus must shift to finding him.

Rain Reign is a triumph reminiscent of Sharon Draper’s Out of My Mind, another excellent novel that illustrates what it’s like to live with special needs. Rose’s first-person narration is spot-on, relaying the repetition of her thoughts, her mind and the rules that guide her life. Readers should note the use of the word “retard” by Rose’s fellow students, but the context is appropriate and accurate.

It’s hard to imagine a more concise depiction of Rose’s Asperger syndrome, a more powerful portrayal of her father or a more heart--tugging story of love, loss and triumph. This poignant novel may very well bring Ann M. Martin her second Newbery Honor (after A Corner of the Universe in 2003) or, better yet, the Newbery Medal.

 

This article was originally published in the October 2014 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 
BAM Customer Reviews