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The Ransom of the Soul : Afterlife and Wealth in Early Western Christianity
by Peter Brown


Overview -

Marking a departure in our understanding of Christian views of the afterlife from 250 to 650 CE, The Ransom of the Soul explores a revolutionary shift in thinking about the fate of the soul that occurred around the time of Rome's fall.  Read more...


 
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More About The Ransom of the Soul by Peter Brown
 
 
 
Overview

Marking a departure in our understanding of Christian views of the afterlife from 250 to 650 CE, The Ransom of the Soul explores a revolutionary shift in thinking about the fate of the soul that occurred around the time of Rome's fall. Peter Brown describes how this shift transformed the Church's institutional relationship to money and set the stage for its domination of medieval society in the West.

Early Christian doctrine held that the living and the dead, as equally sinful beings, needed each other in order to achieve redemption. The devotional intercessions of the living could tip the balance between heaven and hell for the deceased. In the third century, money began to play a decisive role in these practices, as wealthy Christians took ever more elaborate steps to protect their own souls and the souls of their loved ones in the afterlife. They secured privileged burial sites and made lavish donations to churches. By the seventh century, Europe was dotted with richly endowed monasteries and funerary chapels displaying in marble splendor the Christian devotion of the wealthy dead.

In response to the growing influence of money, Church doctrine concerning the afterlife evolved from speculation to firm reality, and personal wealth in the pursuit of redemption led to extraordinary feats of architecture and acts of generosity. But it also prompted stormy debates about money's proper use--debates that resonated through the centuries and kept alive the fundamental question of how heaven and earth could be joined by human agency.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780674967588
  • ISBN-10: 0674967585
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publish Date: April 2015
  • Page Count: 288
  • Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.9 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Christianity - History - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this brilliant, brief, and densely elegant study in the history of ideas, Brown (Through the Eye of a Needle), a renowned scholar of early Christian history, vividly illustrates the complex evolution of ideas about wealth and its role in the afterlife from the Christianity of the second century to the seventh century C.E. The early third-century theologian Tertullian teaches that souls do not go to heaven at death but they experience a time of refreshment as they prepare to move on. During this period, the dead were still close to the living, so surviving family members could help the deceased be more comfortable by offering a communion meal for them. By the fourth century, Brown shows, the wealthy sought to protect the souls of the deceased, and donated money to secure burial tombs close to the shrines of the martyrs. By the sixth and seventh centuries, the practice of remembering the departed develops into the building of magnificent monasteries and shrines. Brown lucidly reveals the details and personalities of these centuries as he continually articulates the dynamic character of early Christianity. (Apr.)

 
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