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Root Development of Vegetable Crops
by John E. Weaver


Overview - This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 Excerpt: ...station, although repeated partial burial by the sand may also have been a factor.  Read more...

 
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More About Root Development of Vegetable Crops by John E. Weaver
 
 
 
Overview
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 Excerpt: ...station, although repeated partial burial by the sand may also have been a factor. The great plasticity of the root system of this species is undoubtedly a factor accounting for its wide distribution. Andropogon furcatus.--Like the preceding, this bluestem is also dominant among prairie grasses. Its smaller resistance to drought, which is shown both by its local and general distribution, can easily be understood when this taller and deeper but coarser-rooted species is compared with the shorter, finer-rooted and more profusely branched A. scoparius. While big bluestem occurs upon high prairies, it makes its best development in the draws and on lower land (plate 6, B, and figs. 11 and 13). It is an important mixed-prairie species, but does not extend into such dry areas as does A. scoparius. The root depth of the big bluestem has already been contrasted where the plants were growing on the high and low prairie at Lincoln (p. 41). Further examination of this species was made at Phillipsburg, Kansas, where it occurs as a dominant among the tall-grasses (p. 75). The very abundant, rather coarse roots grow both vertically and obliquely downward, thoroughly occupying the soil and forming a dense sod. Some of the roots extend laterally in the surface 0.5 foot of soil to a distance of 0.7 to 1.2 feet before turning downward. The working depth is nearly 7 feet. The roots all branch profusely, the main laterals being mostly 0.2 to 0.5 foot in length. The ends of the roots are extremely well branched. Little difference was found in the root habit of these plants of the mixed prairies and those in the true prairie at Lincoln, except in greater depth of penetration. At Phillipsburg some of the deeper roots reached a level of 8.7 feet, while at Lincoln 6.8 feet was the g...

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781159612818
  • ISBN-10: 1159612811
  • Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com
  • Publish Date: May 2012
  • Page Count: 62
  • Dimensions: 9.69 x 7.44 x 0.13 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.28 pounds


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