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Saltypie : A Choctaw Journey from Darkness Into Light
by Tim Tingle and Karen Clarkson


Overview -

Bee stings on the backside That was just the beginning. Tim was about to enter a world of the past, with bullying boys, stones and Indian spirits of long ago. But they were real spirits, real stones, very real memories

In this powerful family saga, author Tim Tingle tells the story of his family s move from Oklahoma Choctaw country to Pasadena, TX.  Read more...


 
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More About Saltypie by Tim Tingle; Karen Clarkson
 
 
 
Overview

Bee stings on the backside That was just the beginning. Tim was about to enter a world of the past, with bullying boys, stones and Indian spirits of long ago. But they were real spirits, real stones, very real memories

In this powerful family saga, author Tim Tingle tells the story of his family s move from Oklahoma Choctaw country to Pasadena, TX. Spanning 50 years, Saltypie describes the problems encountered by his Choctaw grandmotherfrom her orphan days at an Indian boarding school to hardships encountered in her new home on the Gulf Coast.

Tingle says, Stories of modern Indian families rarely grace the printed page. Long before I began writing, I knew this story must be told. Seen through the innocent eyes of a young boy, Saltypie a 2011 Skipping Stones honor book, WordCraft Circle 2012 Children's Literature Award-winner, and winner of the 2011 Paterson Prize for Books for Young People in the category of Grades 4-6 is the story of one family s efforts to honor the past while struggling to gain a foothold in modern America.

Tim Tingle, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is a sought-after storyteller for folklore festivals, library conferences, and schools across America. At the request of Choctaw Chief Pyle, Tim tells a story to the tribe every year before Pyle s State of the Nation Address at the Choctaw Labor Day Gathering. Tim s previous and often reprinted books from Cinco Puntos PressWalking the Choctaw Road and Crossing Bok Chittoreceived numerous awards, but what makes Tim the proudest is the recognition he receives from the American Indian communities.

Karen Clarkson, a Choctaw tribal member, is a self-taught artist who specializes in portraits of Native Americans. She did not start painting until after her children had left home; she has since been widely acclaimed as a Native American painter. She lives in San Leandro, California.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781933693675
  • ISBN-10: 1933693673
  • Publisher: Cinco Puntos Press
  • Publish Date: June 2010
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 7-10


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Cultural Heritage
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > People & Places - United States - Native American
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Family - Multigenerational

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 108.
  • Review Date: 2010-04-26
  • Reviewer: Staff

Moving back and forward in time, Tingle (Walking the Choctaw Road) offers a tribute to his grandmother, Mawmaw, in a quietly poetic story about dealing with adversity. As a young woman, Mawmaw moves from Oklahoma’s Choctaw Nation to Texas, where a rock thrown by a boy cuts her face, possibly causing her eventual blindness. The term “saltypie,” which the family uses to shrug off difficult situations, is coined after the incident by Tingle’s father (then a boy), who is reminded of cherry pie filling by the blood streaming down his mother’s face. Years later, when a young Tingle asks why the boy threw the rock, his uncle replies, “Your grandmother was Indian. That was enough back then.” The story shifts forward again as the family gathers at the hospital while Mawmaw undergoes a successful eye transplant. Using a nice variety of perspectives, newcomer Clarkson conveys Mawmaw’s fortitude and the family’s intergenerational bonds in gauzy paintings; a few images—as when Tingle gets stung by a bee in the book’s abrupt opening—don’t quite hit the mark, but most are distinguished by strong, recognizable emotions. Ages 7–10. (May)

 
BAM Customer Reviews