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The Sea Hunters II
by Clive Cussler and Craig Dirgo

Overview - For twenty-three years, Clive Cussler's NUMA "RM" -- the National Underwater & Marine Agency -- has scoured the rivers and seas in search of lost ships of historic significance. His teams have been inundated by tidal waves, and beset by the vagaries of man and nature, but the results -- and the stories behind them -- have often been dramatic: The 2000 raising of the Confederate submarine Hunley made national headlines.  Read more...

 
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Overview

For twenty-three years, Clive Cussler's NUMA "RM" -- the National Underwater & Marine Agency -- has scoured the rivers and seas in search of lost ships of historic significance. His teams have been inundated by tidal waves, and beset by the vagaries of man and nature, but the results -- and the stories behind them -- have often been dramatic: The 2000 raising of the Confederate submarine Hunley made national headlines.

Here, then, are more true tales of sea- and land-going adventures, as Cussler and his crews set out to track down history. The famous ghost ship Mary Celeste, found floating off the Azores in 1872 with no one on board; the Carpathia, the ship that rescued the Titanic survivors and was itself lost to U-boats six years later; L'Oiseau Blanc, the airplane that almost beat The Spirit of St. Louis across the Atlantic before disappearing in the Maine woods -- all these, plus steamboats, ironclads, a seventeenth-century flagship, a certain famous PT boat, and even a dirigible, prove tantalizing targets as Cussler demonstrates again that truth can be "at least as fun, and sometimes stranger, than fiction" (Men's Journal).

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 0399149252
  • ISBN-10: 0399149252
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam's Sons
  • Publish Date: December 2002
  • Page Count: 464

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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 59.
  • Review Date: 2002-10-07
  • Reviewer: Staff

Well known for his series of action adventure novels starring Dirk Pitt, Cussler is also the founder of the nonprofit National Underwater and Marine Agency, a group that searches for shipwrecks of historical significance. The group does not salvage any artifacts; they simply note the wreckage location and turn their information over to appropriate agencies for further study and planning. In this fast-paced narrative that doesn't tinker with the earlier Sea Hunters' successful formula, Cussler and his teams search for 300 years' worth of wrecks as varied as La Salle's 17th-century flagship, a dirigible lost in a storm off the New Jersey coast in 1933 and the famous PT-109. Cussler traveled along the coast of Texas, up the Mississippi River and to the jungles of the South Pacific in search of historically important wrecks of all sorts. Cussler first provides the historical background for each tragedy (sometimes inventing dialogue when there are no survivors to interview), then dives into his own adventures. One of Cussler's unsuccessful searches took his team to the Maine wilderness, where they tried to locate the wreckage of a French airplane that crashed in 1927 on its way to Washington, having crossed the Atlantic nonstop, before Charles Lindbergh. On the other hand, his crew found the RMS Carpathia (the ship that rescued the survivors of the Titanic), which had been sunk by a German U-boat off the Irish coast in 1918. Cussler's artful writing style and varied experiences while searching for historical treasures make this a first-rate adventure book sure to please any student of history and the odd Pitt fan who takes the plunge. With a 250,000 first printing, many are expected to. (Dec. 2)

 
BookPage Reviews

Clive Cussler's real-life undersea adventures

When does Clive Cussler find time to write? In The Sea Hunters II, a collection of true stories about his searches for lost ships, aircraft and, in one case, cannons, the prolific adventure novelist seems always to be flying to this site or that to oversee yet another against-the-odds quest that he's underwritten with his book royalties. Often, the pursuit yields nothing except the excitement of the hunt and the companionship of fellow enthusiasts. But there are clearly enough successes and near misses to keep the author's blood up.

To spearhead his searches, Cussler founded NUMA (National Underwater & Marine Agency), a real-life echo of the world-girdling NUMA he created for his Dirk Pitt novels. Cussler is quick to point out, however, that his NUMA has only bare-bones financing compared to that of its free-spending fictional counterpart.

In this book, the details of each actual exploration are preceded by a narrative in which the authors reconstruct from historical documents and their own rich imaginations the events leading up to the loss of the object they are looking for. By this device, they are able to "explain" precisely what happened to the crew of the fabled "ghost ship," Mary Celeste, which was found drifting and abandoned in 1872. Discovering what he is convinced are remnants of this ship is one of Cussler's headiest triumphs.

As passionate as he is about this aspect of his work, Cussler never romanticizes it. While Dirk Pitt may command first-class accommodations in exotic locales, his creator is far more likely to find himself in a seedy motel along the Mississippi or the New Jersey coast. Pitt has state-of-the-art equipment; Cussler makes do with state-of-the-moment tools.

The oldest remains Cussler and company look for are those of the French ship L'Amiable, lost in 1685 off the coast of what is now Texas. His most vivid—and probably most accurate—story involves the sinking of Lieutenant John F. Kennedy's PT-109 in 1943. There is also a diverting account in which the explorers cruise a lake in Vermont to look for Aunt Sally, an experimental boat that may or may not have gone down there in the late 1820s. For pure drama, nothing else matches the authors' description of the steamboat New Orleans as it is tossed and pelted on the Mississippi River by the New Madrid earthquake of 1811.

The best part of these engaging tales is that they all have modestly happy endings. Even when the searchers come up empty- handed, they console themselves with the prospect of trying again another day. And often they do.

 
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