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Searching for the Oldest Stars : Ancient Relics from the Early Universe
by Anna Frebel and Ann M. Hentschel


Overview -

Astronomers study the oldest observable stars in the universe in much the same way that archaeologists study ancient artifacts on Earth. Here, Anna Frebel--who is credited with discovering several of the oldest and most primitive stars using the world's largest telescopes--takes readers into the far-flung depths of space and time to provide a gripping firsthand account of the cutting-edge science of stellar archaeology.  Read more...


 
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More About Searching for the Oldest Stars by Anna Frebel; Ann M. Hentschel
 
 
 
Overview

Astronomers study the oldest observable stars in the universe in much the same way that archaeologists study ancient artifacts on Earth. Here, Anna Frebel--who is credited with discovering several of the oldest and most primitive stars using the world's largest telescopes--takes readers into the far-flung depths of space and time to provide a gripping firsthand account of the cutting-edge science of stellar archaeology.

Weaving the latest findings in astronomy with her own compelling insights as one of the world's leading researchers in the field, Frebel explains how sections of the night sky are "excavated" in the hunt for these extremely rare relic stars--some of which have been shining for more than 13 billion years--and how this astonishing quest is revealing tantalizing new details about the earliest times in the universe. She vividly describes how the very first stars formed soon after the big bang and then exploded as supernovae, leaving behind chemical fingerprints that were incorporated into the ancient stars we can still observe today. She shows how these fingerprints provide clues to the cosmic origin of the elements, early star and galaxy formation, and the assembly process of the Milky Way. Along the way, Frebel recounts her own stories of discovery, offering an insider's perspective on this exciting frontier of science.

Lively and accessible, this book sheds vital new light on the origins and evolution of the cosmos while providing a unique look into life as an astronomer.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780691165066
  • ISBN-10: 0691165068
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publish Date: November 2015
  • Page Count: 320
  • Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.55 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Science > Astronomy - General
Books > Science > Physics - Astrophysics

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-11-02
  • Reviewer: Staff

German-born astronomer Frebel, an assistant professor of physics at MIT, makes this crash course in astronomy accessible to stargazers of all knowledge levels. She starts with the basics, including a summary of the historical connections between astronomy and physics, and incrementally adds topics of greater technicalitysuch as the universe's "chemical evolution," the life cycle of stars, the production of heavy elements, and spectral analysisup to her own research on metal-poor stars. Woven through the science are personal anecdotes from Frebel, which give the impression of a face-to-face lesson with a favorite professor. The information is not organized for ease of reference, but in a manner that flows steadily as new material accretes, making comprehension easier for those with less background knowledge. The sheer density of information can make for slower and more difficult reading, but anyone with a strong interest in astronomy will appreciate the way Frebel employs diagrams and terminology. This book is not an introductory survey of astronomy, but rather an in-depth discussion written by an expert in the field. Frebel offers a handy learning tool for fledgling astronomers and a fascinating, enjoyable look into her own research. (Nov.)

 
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