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Seizing Destiny : How America Grew from Sea to Shining Sea
by Richard Kluger

Overview - From Pulitzer Prize-winning social historian Kluger comes this comprehensive and balanced chronicle of how the vast territory of the United States was assembled to accommodate the aspirations of its people--regardless of who objected.  Read more...

 
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Overview

From Pulitzer Prize-winning social historian Kluger comes this comprehensive and balanced chronicle of how the vast territory of the United States was assembled to accommodate the aspirations of its people--regardless of who objected.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780375413414
  • ISBN-10: 0375413413
  • Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group
  • Publish Date: August 2007
  • Page Count: 649

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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 48.
  • Review Date: 2007-05-28
  • Reviewer: Staff

In an admirable and important addition to his distinguished oeuvre, Pulitzer Prize–winner Kluger (Ashes to Ashes, a history of the tobacco wars) focuses on the “darker side” of America's rapid expansion westward. He begins with European settlement of the so-called New World, explaining that Britain's successful colonization depended not so much on conquest of or friendship with the Indians, but on encouraging emigration. Kluger then fruitfully situates the American Revolution as part of the story of expansion: the Founding Fathers based their bid for independence on assertions about the expanse of American “virgin earth,” and after the war that very land became the new country's main economic resource. The heart of the book, not surprisingly, covers the 19th century, lingering in detail over such well-known episodes as the Louisiana Purchase and William Seward's acquisition of Alaska. The final chapter looks at expansion in the 20th century. Kluger provocatively suggests that, compared with western European powers, the United States engaged in relatively little global colonization, because the closing of the western frontier sated America's expansionist hunger. Each chapter of this long, absorbing book is rewarding as Kluger meets the high standard set by his earlier work. 10 maps. (Aug.)

 
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