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Spinning the Law : Trying Cases in the Court of Public Opinion
by Kendall Coffey and Alan M. Dershowitz


Overview - A behind-the-scenes analysis of media strategies not taught in law school or journalism classes, this collection of entertaining examples and explanations make for ideal reading for everyone fascinated by celebrity legal problems.  Read more...

 
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More About Spinning the Law by Kendall Coffey; Alan M. Dershowitz
 
 
 
Overview
A behind-the-scenes analysis of media strategies not taught in law school or journalism classes, this collection of entertaining examples and explanations make for ideal reading for everyone fascinated by celebrity legal problems.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781616142100
  • ISBN-10: 1616142103
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publish Date: September 2010
  • Page Count: 404
  • Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.38 x 1.14 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Law > General
Books > Social Science > Media Studies

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-07-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

Coffey is a former U.S. attorney who now plies the airwaves (he has appeared on the Today show, Larry King Live, among others), offering commentary on high-profile and sensational legal cases. As U.S. attorney in Florida, he was involved in such cases himself: the Elian Gonzalez case and the 2000 presidential recount. Now he calls on his experience to deconstruct the art and theory of media manipulation in this candid, and cynical, look at how lawyers use the media to shape public perceptions of their clients including Martha Stewart, Scott Peterson, Michael Jackson, and O.J. Simpson. His modus operandi is to give a short example of a media ploy, such as the decision to put Kobe Bryant's alleged victim's sexual history in play, and to follow the example with a pithy "Spinning Lesson" such as "Questions with shock value have news value." Coffey is knowledgeable about the nuances of spin, but his flippant style, although often entertaining, can be out of sync with the sordid cases and the often offensive and borderline ethical behavior of the spinners. Coffey ends with a sentence championing the virtues of the Constitution. It might just be spin. (Sept.)

 
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