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A Study in Sherlock : Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon
by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger


Overview - BESTSELLING AUTHORS GO HOLMES--IN AN IRRESISTIBLE NEW COLLECTION edited by award-winning Sherlockians Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger
Neil Gaiman. Laura Lippman. Lee Child. These are just three of eighteen superstar authors who provide fascinating, thrilling, and utterly original perspectives on Sherlock Holmes in this one-of-a-kind book.
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More About A Study in Sherlock by Laurie R. King; Leslie S. Klinger
 
 
 
Overview
BESTSELLING AUTHORS GO HOLMES--IN AN IRRESISTIBLE NEW COLLECTION edited by award-winning Sherlockians Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger
Neil Gaiman. Laura Lippman. Lee Child. These are just three of eighteen superstar authors who provide fascinating, thrilling, and utterly original perspectives on Sherlock Holmes in this one-of-a-kind book. These modern masters place the sleuth in suspenseful new situations, create characters who solve Holmesian mysteries, contemplate Holmes in his later years, fill gaps in the Sherlock Holmes Canon, and reveal their own personal obsessions with the Great Detective.
Thomas Perry, for example, has Dr. Watson tell his tale, in a virtuoso work of alternate history that finds President McKinley approaching the sleuth with a disturbing request; Lee Child sends an FBI agent to investigate a crime near today's Baker Street--only to get a twenty-first-century shock; Jacqueline Winspear spins a story of a plucky boy inspired by the detective to make his own deductions; and graphic artist Colin Cotterill portrays his struggle to complete this assignment in his hilarious "The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story."*
In perfect tribute comes this delicious collection of twisty, clever, and enthralling studies of a timeless icon.
Featuring stories from
Alan Bradley
Tony Broadbent
Jan Burke
Lionel Chetwynd
Lee Child
Colin Cotterill*
Neil Gaiman
Laura Lippman
Gayle Lynds & John Sheldon
Phillip & Jerry Margolin
Margaret Maron
Thomas Perry
S. J. Rozan
Dana Stabenow
Charles Todd
Jacqueline Winspear
*print-version only

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780812982466
  • ISBN-10: 0812982460
  • Publisher: Bantam Books
  • Publish Date: October 2011
  • Page Count: 385


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Mystery & Detective - Collections & Anthologies
Books > Fiction > Mystery & Detective - Historical

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-09-05
  • Reviewer: Staff

King (The Beekeeper’s Apprentice and 10 other Mary Russell novels) and Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) have not stuck to the usual suspects for this stellar anthology of 16 new short stories that pay homage to the great detective. Perhaps the highlight is S.J. Rozan’s “The Men with the Twisted Lips,” a particularly clever alternate take on a canonical Holmes story. Phillip and Jerry Margolin provide a fair-play whodunit centering on the purported discovery of evidence of a Holmes story written exclusively for Queen Victoria in “The Adventure of the Purloined Paget.” Colin Cotterill takes a humorous approach in his illustrated selection, “The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story,” while Charles Todd’s “The Case That Holmes Lost” convincingly recreates Doyle himself, grappling with a lawsuit aimed at his most famous creation. Other contributors include Lee Child, Neil Gaiman, Laura Lippman, Margaret Maron, and Jacqueline Winspear. (Nov.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Olympics host city takes center stage

Robert Reid is the U.S. Travel Editor for Lonely Planet. In a column written exclusively for BookPage, he highlights terrific travel books, both old and new. This month, the former London resident selects some of the best guides to the storied British capital, in honor of its second time hosting the Olympic Games.


Every time I go to London, where I was lucky enough to live a decade ago, I return home energized by its deep history and newly motivated to explore my own home. And to read.

All eyes are on London this summer for the Olympic Games, which begin July 27, so it’s high time to learn more about the host. The best starting place is Peter Ackroyd’s London: The Biography, which treats the city as a person, unlocking insights like alleys that have never known quiet, and church bells built to out-clang their neighbors. Or zero in on pre-Olympic East London with another excellent Ackroyd book, Thames: The Biography.

If you’ve been watching the BBC’s “Sherlock” on PBS (and you should), you’ll want to pick up the entertaining collection of 18 well-known authors giving their own take on London’s most famous detective in A Study in Sherlock. Not every story is set in London: Tom Perry’s story puts Sherlock and Dr. Watson in Buffalo, New York, with the London duo trying to save President McKinley from an anarchist’s fatal bullet.

Sherlock isn’t the only one getting a modern makeover—next up: English cuisine. Fergus Henderson’s The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating—a lively foodie read with an intro by Anthony Bourdain—helped kick-start the whole nose-to-tail eating phenomenon with a book that the New York Times calls the Ulysses of the Slow Food movement. And if you go to London, you can sample some of the best English cuisine not far from the Olympic sites at Henderson’s St. John Bread & Wine in Spitalfields.

For a deeper dive into the British psyche, try Bill Bryson’s hilarious Notes from a Small Island, an account of the Iowa expat’s farewell to his long-time adopted English home and culture. Bryson often goes off-track to remote, hard-to-reach corners, requiring good shoes and a sense of humor. 

And if you have kids to entertain, Lonely Planet’s new Not for Parents travel series is a fantastic help. The best of the bunch is Not for Parents: London, illuminating everything from jellied eels and Austin Powers’ hangouts to the place where you can see Harry Potter’s Platform 9 ¾ in real life.

 

Robert Reid lives in New York City, but is still uncertain whether he prefers his one-time home of London.

 
BAM Customer Reviews