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Swing Low : A Life
by Miriam Toews


Overview - "Audacious, original and profoundly moving . . . . Healing is a likely outcome of a bookimbued with the righteous anger, compassion and humanity of Swing Low ."-- Globe and Mail (Canada)

Reverberatingwith emotional power, authenticity, and insight , Swing Low isMiriam Toews' daring and deeply affecting memoir ofher father's struggle with manic depression in a small Mennonite community inrural Canada.  Read more...


 
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More About Swing Low by Miriam Toews
 
 
 
Overview
"Audacious, original and profoundly moving . . . . Healing is a likely outcome of a bookimbued with the righteous anger, compassion and humanity of Swing Low."--Globe and Mail (Canada)

Reverberatingwith emotional power, authenticity, and insight, Swing Low isMiriam Toews' daring and deeply affecting memoir ofher father's struggle with manic depression in a small Mennonite community inrural Canada. Personal and touching, a stirring counterpart to her novel IrmaVoth and reminiscent of works by Susan Cheever, Gail Caldwell, Mary Karr, and Alexandra Styron, Swing Low is an elegiacode to a difficult life by an author drawing from the deepest well of insight, craft, and emotion.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780062070166
  • ISBN-10: 0062070169
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial
  • Publish Date: September 2011
  • Page Count: 228
  • Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.5 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Educators
Books > Psychology > Psychopathology - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-05-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

Imagining her troubled father telling his life story, Canadian novelist Toews (The Flying Troutmans) offers a touching memoir. When her father was 17 years old, he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Going against the accepted 1950s medical advice, he dived into life, determined to become a "better human being." He married, raised a family, and taught school for 40 years. Yet when he committed suicide, he felt his life had amounted to little. Toews toggles between her father's memories of a happy life and his current circumstances as a patient in the local hospital, following a breakdown near the end of his life. "How to explain the process of putting the pieces of my brain together: as though I'm attempting to walk down a street and various limbs, arms and legs, continue to drop off my body. I'm getting nowhere." Teaching provided the scaffolding of normalcy for Toews's father, allowing him to function successfully in public, though later he retreated into silence while with his family. Raised within the strict, conservative Mennonite religion, Toews's father never admitted to his illness, seeing it as a flaw festering within his weak character. In this sympathetic telling, Toews shows how the opposite was true. (Sept.)

 
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