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There Is No God and He Is Always with You : A Search for God in Odd Places
by Brad Warner


Overview - Can you be an atheist and still believe in God?
Can you be a true believer and still doubt?
Can Zen give us a way past our constant fighting about God?

Brad Warner was initially interested in Buddhism because he wanted to find God, but Buddhism is usually thought of as godless.  Read more...


 
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More About There Is No God and He Is Always with You by Brad Warner
 
 
 
Overview
Can you be an atheist and still believe in God?
Can you be a true believer and still doubt?
Can Zen give us a way past our constant fighting about God?

Brad Warner was initially interested in Buddhism because he wanted to find God, but Buddhism is usually thought of as godless. In the three decades since Warner began studying Zen, he has grappled with paradoxical questions about God and managed to come up with some answers. In this fascinating search for a way beyond the usual arguments between fundamentalists and skeptics, Warner offers a profoundly engaging and idiosyncratic take on the ineffable power of the "ground of all being."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781608681839
  • ISBN-10: 1608681831
  • Publisher: New World Library
  • Publish Date: June 2013
  • Page Count: 189
  • Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.55 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Atheism
Books > Body, Mind & Spirit > Mysticism
Books > Biography & Autobiography > Religious

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-06-10
  • Reviewer: Staff

In his new book, Warner (Hardcore Zen) momentarily sets aside his punk weapons of iconoclasm and takes a more respectful, even reverential tone to a perennial question: does God exist? As a practicing Zen Buddhist, his way of considering this question is entangled in oft-misunderstood concepts such as enlightenment. Warner never shies away from such complications; instead, they become grounds where the Western understanding of God and the Buddhist approach to reality and experience meet. For Warner, his practice is “a way to approach and understand God without dealing with religion.” His God is one to be experienced, felt, and intuited, something that lies beneath the surface of reality that is already naturally understood, if only one could “learn to listen to silence, to listen to nothing, and to learn from nothing.” In accompanying the punk Zen priest on such a singular journey through his understanding of God, the reader is asked to partake in meditation with Warner not on the Hebrew, Christian, Islamic, or any other traditional God, but rather One that can be found in daily experience when conceptual thinking has been silenced. (July)

 
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