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This Is How : Proven Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterhood, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude & More: For
by Augusten Burroughs


Overview - From the #1 "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Running with Scissors" comes a groundbreaking book that explores how to survive the "un-survivable" and will challenge the conventional notion of self-help books.  Read more...

 
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Overview

From the #1 "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Running with Scissors" comes a groundbreaking book that explores how to survive the "un-survivable" and will challenge the conventional notion of self-help books.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780312563554
  • ISBN-10: 0312563558
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publish Date: May 2012
  • Page Count: 230

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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-03-19
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this hilarious and searingly straightforward memoir, Burroughs (Running with Scissors) turns the self-help genre upside down with his advice on matters ranging broadly from “how to be fat” and “how to lose someone you love” to “how to hold onto your dream or maybe not” and “how to finish your drink.” On “how to find love,” for example, he counsels, “be the person you are, not the person you think you should be… if you want to have a chance at meeting somebody with whom you are genuinely compatible, never put your best foot forward… be exactly the person you would be if you were alone or with somebody it was safe to fart around.” On “Why Having It All Is Not,” Burroughs commends the virtues of limits and the ways that such limits force improvisation; he doesn’t believe “you can feel deep satisfaction in your life unless your life contains restless areas, holes, and imperfections.” In “How to End Your Life,” Burroughs, recalling his own teenage experience, distinguishes between suicide and ending life. After his brush with suicide, he realizes that he really didn’t want to kill himself; what he really wanted was to end his life, which he accomplishes simply by changing his name and walking out the door and starting a new life. As always, Burroughs is smart and energetically forthright about living and loving. (May)

 
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