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This Moose Belongs to Me
by Oliver Jeffers


Overview - From the illustrator of the #1 smash hit The Day the Crayons Quit comes the age-old tale of a boy and his moose . . .
Wilfred is a boy with rules. He lives a very orderly life. It's fortunate, then, that he has a pet who abides by rules, such as not making noise while Wilfred educates him on his record collection.
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More About This Moose Belongs to Me by Oliver Jeffers
 
 
 
Overview
From the illustrator of the #1 smash hit The Day the Crayons Quit comes the age-old tale of a boy and his moose . . .
Wilfred is a boy with rules. He lives a very orderly life. It's fortunate, then, that he has a pet who abides by rules, such as not making noise while Wilfred educates him on his record collection. There is, however, one rule that Wilfred's pet has difficulty following: Going whichever way Wilfred wants to go. Perhaps this is because Wilfred's pet doesn't quite realize that he belongs to anyone.
A moose can be obstinate in such ways.
Fortunately, the two manage to work out a compromise. Let's just say it involves apples.
Oliver Jeffers, the bestselling creator of Stuck and The Incredible Book Eating Boy, delivers another deceptively simple book sure to make kids giggle.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780399161032
  • ISBN-10: 0399161031
  • Publisher: Philomel Books
  • Publish Date: November 2012
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 3-7


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Pets
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Humorous Stories

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-10-22
  • Reviewer: Staff

It won’t take readers long to see that Wilfred has moose problems. He tries hard to make Marcel the moose obey his many rules (“Rule 7 : Maintaining a certain proximity to home”), but Marcel is only vaguely interested in Wilfred. What he really likes are apples. Wilfred’s role as moose owner is further cast into doubt when a random old lady greets Marcel as Rodrigo. “You’re back!” she cries. (Marcel reacts warmly, but only because she has an apple.) Eventually, Wilfred is able to recognize Marcel’s independence; it’s a useful and unexpectedly heartwarming lesson in lowered expectations. Nervous Wilfred is dressed in a geeky bowtie and suspenders, while Marcel is the size of a garden shed, with antlers like towel racks. What really ups the ante are Jeffers’s (Stuck) incongruously grandiose backdrops. Wilfred’s struggle plays out against dawn-kissed mountain ranges, brooding spruces, and sweeping American plains, giving the proceedings an air of faux-solemn dignity that’s hilariously at odds with Wilfred’s dorky personality. The moose may not belong to Wilfred, but the laughs certainly belong to Jeffers. Ages 3–7. (Nov.)

 
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