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Tokyo 1955-1970 : A New Avant-Garde
by Michio Hayashi and Mika Yoshitake and Miryam Sas and Mitsuda Yuri


Overview - Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde explores the extraordinary convergence of artists and other creators in Japan's capital city during the radically transformative postwar period. Examining works from a range of media--painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, printmaking, video and film, as well as graphic design, architecture, musical composition and dance--this is the first publication in English to focus in depth on the full scope of postwar art in Japan.  Read more...

 
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More About Tokyo 1955-1970 by Michio Hayashi; Mika Yoshitake; Miryam Sas; Mitsuda Yuri
 
 
 
Overview
Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde explores the extraordinary convergence of artists and other creators in Japan's capital city during the radically transformative postwar period. Examining works from a range of media--painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, printmaking, video and film, as well as graphic design, architecture, musical composition and dance--this is the first publication in English to focus in depth on the full scope of postwar art in Japan. During this period, Tokyo was a vibrant hub that attracted such critical artistic figures as Taro Okamoto, Hiroshi Nakamura, Ay-O, Yoko Ono, Mieko Shiomi and Tetsumi Kudo; photographers Daido Moriyama, Eikoh Hosoe and Shomei Tomatsu; illustrators and graphic designers Tadanori Yokoo, Kohei Sugiura and Kiyoshi Awazu; and architects Arata Isozaki and Kisho Kurokawa; as well as many important artists' collectives. Curator Doryun Chong's essay investigates Tokyo's sociopolitical context and the massive urban changes that set the stage for the city to emerge as a vital node in the international avant-garde network. Essays by scholars Hayashi Michio and Miryam Sas and curator Mika Yoshitake discuss critical concepts in art and culture at this time, including "graphism," which manifested itself across various mediums; the development of new sculptural languages; and the "intermedia" tendency that engendered provocative cross-pollination among artistic genres. Masatoshi Nakajima provides an illustrated chronology and Yuri Mitsuda supplies artist biographies. Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde brings fresh insight to this dynamic metropolis during a time of remarkable artistic burgeoning.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780870708343
  • ISBN-10: 0870708341
  • Publisher: Museum of Modern Art
  • Publish Date: November 2012
  • Page Count: 264
  • Dimensions: 10.8 x 9.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Art > Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions - Group Shows
Books > Art > Asian - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-11-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

Tokyo during this 15-year span was the scene of intense economic, cultural, and political activity, and its artists displayed an awareness of global trends without sacrificing a sense of postwar Japanese trauma boldly represented by Tomatsu Shomei’s stark photograph of a Nagasaki woman’s bomb-scarred face. This catalogue of that period’s art, which accompanies an eponymous exhibition, opens with the standard historiographical essay on the period and its art. Three subsequent essays are much more scholarly, throwing Marxist-Hegelian discourse, concepts of agency, and a kitchen sink of theorists (e.g., Walter Benjamin) at their topic. Reproductions of artworks show the tension between the seen and the repressed or shadowed: Yamaguchi Kasuhiro’s “shape-shifting” wire-mesh sculptures; photographs of Nakanishi Natsuyuki’s performance of Clothespins Assert Churning Action, in which he walked around Tokyo in a mask made of clothespins; and Takamatsu Jiro’s Oneness of Concrete, “in which broken fragments of concrete are pieced together inside a container made of the same concrete, explor the infinite possibilities in opposing conditions of part and whole, absence and presence.” The works possess a distinct sharpness, and the book does a thorough job of explaining their nuances. The Japan Foundation, in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, has again provided a definitive examination of Japanese art for an American audience. 270 illus. (Nov.)

 
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