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I, Too, Am America
by Langston Hughes and Bryan Collier


Overview - Winner of the Coretta Scott King illustrator award, "I, Too, Am America "blends the poetic wisdom of Langston Hughes with visionary illustrations from Bryan Collier in this inspirational picture book that carries the promise of equality.

"I, too, sing America.  Read more...


 
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More About I, Too, Am America by Langston Hughes; Bryan Collier
 
 
 
Overview
Winner of the Coretta Scott King illustrator award, "I, Too, Am America "blends the poetic wisdom of Langston Hughes with visionary illustrations from Bryan Collier in this inspirational picture book that carries the promise of equality.

"I, too, sing America.
I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong."
Langston Hughes was a courageous voice of his time, and his authentic call for equality still rings true today. Beautiful paintings from Barack Obama illustrator Bryan Collier accompany and reinvent the celebrated lines of the poem "I, Too," creating a breathtaking reminder to all Americans that we are united despite our differences.
This picture book of Langston Hughes s celebrated poem, "I, Too, Am America," is also a Common Core Text Exemplar for Poetry."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781442420083
  • ISBN-10: 1442420081
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
  • Publish Date: May 2012
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Poetry - General
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > People & Places - United States - African-American

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-03-05
  • Reviewer: Staff

Caldecott Honor artist Collier (Dave the Potter) uses Hughes’s well-known poem as text for a visual history of Pullman railway porters, one of the first jobs that offered African-American men steady pay, dignity, and a ladder into the middle class. Hughes’s lines—“They send me to eat in the kitchen/ When company comes,/ But I laugh,/ And eat well,/ And grow strong”—fit beautifully with the story of the porters, giving the poem new meaning and impact. Collier’s portraits of the porters at work alternate with bold, sweeping spreads of cotton fields, onto which a porter scatters discarded books and magazines, planting knowledge along the railway lines. The story travels from South to North and from old to new, ending in Harlem, where a contemporary African-American mother rides in a subway car, her son gazing out the window. In the next spread, he’s seen in startling closeup, parting and peering between the stripes of an all-but-invisible American flag. “I, too, am America,” he says. It’s a powerful metaphor for looking at African-American history—and the issue of race in America—from the inside out. Ages 4–8. Agent: Marcia Wernick, Wernick and Pratt Agency. (May)

 
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