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The Translation of Dr. Apelles : A Love Story
by David Treuer


Overview - Dr. Apelles, a translator of ancient texts, has made an unsettling discovery: a manuscript that has languished for years, written in a language that only he speaks. Moving back and forth between the scholar and his text, from a lone man in a labyrinthine archive to a pair of beautiful young Indian lovers in an unspoiled and snowy woodland, David Treuer weaves together two love stories.  Read more...

 
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More About The Translation of Dr. Apelles by David Treuer
 
 
 
Overview
Dr. Apelles, a translator of ancient texts, has made an unsettling discovery: a manuscript that has languished for years, written in a language that only he speaks. Moving back and forth between the scholar and his text, from a lone man in a labyrinthine archive to a pair of beautiful young Indian lovers in an unspoiled and snowy woodland, David Treuer weaves together two love stories. Enthralling and suspenseful, The Translation of Dr. Apelles dares to redefine the Native American novel.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780307386625
  • ISBN-10: 0307386627
  • Publisher: Vintage Books USA
  • Publish Date: February 2008
  • Page Count: 315
  • Dimensions: 8 x 5.5 x 0.76 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.54 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Literary

 
BookPage Reviews

The Translation of Dr. Apelles

In his third novel, Treuer offers a complex, multilayered narrative about a pair of mythical Native American orphans and the man who discovers their story. A scholar and linguist, Dr. Apelles is 42 years old and devoted to his intellectual pursuits, which include the translation of rare Native-American texts. When he comes upon a manuscript about two Native American children who were orphaned in the Midwest during the 19th century, he knows he has made a special discovery. The twins—a girl named Eta and a boy named Bimaadiz—are adopted by different families and grow up as friends. When they come of age, they fall in love, experiencing an idyllic romance, despite circumstances that threaten to separate them. One of Bimaadiz's friends wants Eta for himself, and she is captured by the members of a brothel. As Dr. Apelles translates the tale of the twins, he has a sort of epiphany: After a lifetime of bachelorhood, he finds he is desperately lonely and in need of love. He is drawn to a young woman named Campaspe, who works at the library where he does research, and his developing relationship with her parallels the story of the twins as the novel unfolds. Moving skillfully between the past and present, Treuer—an Ojibwe Indian from Minnesota—constructs a wonderfully rich narrative about the power of stories and the importance of love.

 
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