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True Believer : Stalin's Last American Spy
by Kati Marton


Overview - "Relevant...fascinating...vividly reconstructed." -- The New York Times Book Review

"Riveting reading...a mesmerizing look at Cold War espionage." -- USA TODAY

This astonishing real-life spy thriller, filled with danger, misplaced loyalties, betrayal, treachery, and pure evil, with a plot twist worthy of John le Carre, is relevant today as a tale of fanaticism and the lengths it takes us to.  Read more...


 
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More About True Believer by Kati Marton
 
 
 
Overview
"Relevant...fascinating...vividly reconstructed." --The New York Times Book Review

"Riveting reading...a mesmerizing look at Cold War espionage." --USA TODAY

This astonishing real-life spy thriller, filled with danger, misplaced loyalties, betrayal, treachery, and pure evil, with a plot twist worthy of John le Carre, is relevant today as a tale of fanaticism and the lengths it takes us to.

True Believer reveals the life of Noel Field, an American who betrayed his country and crushed his family. Field, once a well-meaning and privileged American, spied for Stalin during the 1930s and '40s. Then, a pawn in Stalin's sinister master strategy, Field was kidnapped and tortured by the KGB and forced to testify against his own Communist comrades.

How does an Ivy League-educated, US State Department employee, deeply rooted in American culture and history, become a hardcore Stalinist? The 1930s, when Noel Field joined the secret underground of the International Communist Movement, were a time of national collapse: ten million Americans unemployed, rampant racism, retreat from the world just as fascism was gaining ground, and Washington--pre FDR--parched of fresh ideas. Communism promised the righting of social and political wrongs and many in Field's generation were seduced by its siren song. Few, however, went as far as Noel Field in betraying their own country.

With a reporter's eye for detail, and a historian's grasp of the cataclysmic events of the twentieth century, Kati Marton captures Field's riveting quest for a life of meaning that went horribly wrong. True Believer is supported by unprecedented access to Field family correspondence, Soviet Secret Police records, and reporting on key players from Alger Hiss, CIA Director Allen Dulles, and World War II spy master, "Wild Bill" Donovan--to the most sinister of all: Josef Stalin. A story of another time, this is a tale relevant for all times.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781476763767
  • ISBN-10: 1476763763
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publish Date: September 2016
  • Page Count: 304
  • Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Historical - General
Books > History > Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Books > Political Science > Intelligence & Espionage

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-07-11
  • Reviewer: Staff

With thorough research and stylistic verve, Marton (Paris: A Love Story), a veteran journalist and popular historian, relates the tragic tale of Noel Haviland Field (1904–1970), the scion of a well-off Quaker family who attended Harvard, began a successful career at the State Department, and become a spy for the Soviet Union. After recruiting family members to join him in this work, Field fled the U.S. when he was exposed by Whittaker Chambers. He then fell under Soviet suspicion because of his brief work for the OSS (forerunner to the CIA) during WWII and support for some anti-Stalinist communist dissidents. Lured to Prague under false pretenses, Field was arrested by Stalinist agents, tortured, and held in solitary confinement in Budapest for five years. Yet even when freed, Field defended the repressive government that followed the crushing of the 1956 Hungarian revolution. In his last years, Field edited an obscure Hungarian literary magazine where he informed on colleagues, remained a loyal apparatchik even after Khrushchev denounced Stalin, and died in obscurity. Marton, whose Hungarian journalist parents scored the only interview Field and his wife ever gave to the Western press, tells Field’s story beautifully, reminding readers of the potential horrors of well-meaning but unquestioning idealism. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM. (Sept.)

 
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