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An Undisturbed Peace
by Mary Glickman


Overview - Hailed as "the finest depiction of the infamous Trail of Tears," this unflinching novel sheds light on a tragic history (Pat Conroy).

As the tribes of the South make the grueling journey across the Mississippi River, a trio of disparate characters is united by a "far-reaching story of love, courage, and honor" ( Booklist ).
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More About An Undisturbed Peace by Mary Glickman
 
 
 
Overview
Hailed as "the finest depiction of the infamous Trail of Tears," this unflinching novel sheds light on a tragic history (Pat Conroy).

As the tribes of the South make the grueling journey across the Mississippi River, a trio of disparate characters is united by a "far-reaching story of love, courage, and honor" (Booklist).

Greensborough, North Carolina, 1828. Abrahan Bento Sassaporta Naggar has traveled to America from the filthy streets of East London in search of a better life. But Abe's visions of a privileged apprenticeship in the Sassaporta Brothers' empire are soon replaced with the grim reality of indentured servitude.

Some fifty miles west, Dark Water of the Mountains, the daughter of a powerful Cherokee chief, leads a life of irreverent solitude. Twenty years ago, she renounced her family's plans for her to marry a wealthy white man--a decision that soon proves fateful.

And in Georgia, a black slave named Jacob has resigned himself to a life of loss and injustice in a Cherokee city of refuge for criminals.

From the author of Marching to Zion and One More River comes a sweeping novel of American history. As their stories converge in the shameful machinations of history, three outsiders will bear witness to the horrors known as Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act--just as they also discover the possibility for hope. See why Library Journal raves, "This absorbing and vivid portrait of 19th-century America will attract serious historical fiction fans."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781504018340
  • ISBN-10: 1504018346
  • Publisher: Open Road Media
  • Publish Date: February 2016
  • Page Count: 378
  • Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.9 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Historical - General
Books > Fiction > Jewish
Books > Fiction > Romance - Multicultural & Interracial

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-10-26
  • Reviewer: Staff

Glickman (Marching to Zion) has written a sympathetic, well-executed historical novel. During the late 1820s, Abrahan Bento Sassaporta Naggar, better known as Abe, is a plucky, young Jewish bondsman working for his authoritarian Uncle Isadore at a trading post in Greensboro, N.C. Abe has immigrated to America to escape the anti-Semitic persecution he faced in London. While on his sales route into the foothills, he meets and falls in unrequited love with a mysterious older Cherokee woman named Marian, known as Dark Water among the tribe. After learning of a runaway slave named Jacob with a family connection to Marian, Abe journeys to Echota, the capital city of the Cherokee Nation, to meet him. In this tale of three ordinary, eminently relatable people, the author adeptly sets Abes story against the backdrop of Andrew Jacksons shameful, greedy relocation of the Cherokees and the land grab of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The well-intentioned Abe makes two trips to Washington, D.C., and pleads the Cherokees cause in the halls of government, but to little avail. Glickman does an outstanding job of weaving to- gether the narratives of her three disparate characters. (Jan.)

 
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