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Unnaturally Delicious : How Science and Technology Are Serving Up Super Foods to Save the World
by Jayson Lusk


Overview -

The food discussion in America can be quite pessimistic. With high obesity rates, diabetes, climate change, chemical use, water contamination, and farm animal abuse, it would seem that there wasn't very much room for a positive perspective. The fear that there just isn't enough food has expanded to new areas of concern about water availability, rising health care costs, and dying bees.  Read more...


 
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More About Unnaturally Delicious by Jayson Lusk
 
 
 
Overview

The food discussion in America can be quite pessimistic. With high obesity rates, diabetes, climate change, chemical use, water contamination, and farm animal abuse, it would seem that there wasn't very much room for a positive perspective. The fear that there just isn't enough food has expanded to new areas of concern about water availability, rising health care costs, and dying bees.

In "Unnaturally Delicious, " Lusk makes room for optimism by writing the story of the changing food system, suggesting that technology and agriculture can work together in a healthy and innovative way to help solve the world's largest food issues and improve the farming system as we know it.

This is the story of the innovators and innovations shaping the future of food. You ll meet an ex-farmer entrepreneur whose software is now being used all over the world to help farmers increase yields and reduce nutrient runoff and egg producers who ve created new hen housing systems that improve animal welfare at an affordable price. There are scientists growing meat in the lab. Without the cow. College students are coaxing bacteria to signal food quality and fight obesity. Nutrient enhanced rice and sweet potatoes are aiming to solve malnutrition in the developing world. Geneticists are creating new wheat varieties that allow farmers sustainably grow more with less. And, we ll learn how to get fresh, tasty, 3D printed food at the touch of a button, perhaps even delivered to us by a robotic chef.

Innovation is the American way. Thomas Jefferson, George Washington Carver, and John Harvey Kellogg were food and agricultural entrepreneurs. Their delicious innovations led to new healthy, tasty, convenient, and environmentally friendly food. The creations were unnaturally delicious. Unnatural because the foods and practices they fashioned were man-made solutions to natural and man-made problems.

Now the world is filled with new challenges changing the way we think about food. Who are the scientists, entrepreneurs, and progressive farmers who meet these challenges and search for solutions? "Unnaturally Delicious" has the answers."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781250074300
  • ISBN-10: 1250074304
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publish Date: March 2016
  • Page Count: 256
  • Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.75 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Technology > Agriculture - General
Books > Science > Life Sciences - Horticulture
Books > Science > Biotechnology

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-05-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this lively look at the modern intersection of technology and food, Lusk, a professor of agricultural economics at Oklahoma State University, examines several ways that researchers are seeking to feed the world, combat malnutrition, and conserve resources. Robotic chefs, 3-D printed food, synthetic biology, and meat grown in a petri dish were once the province of science fiction, but these ideas are fast becoming realities as scientists tinker with nature's bounty. Lusk digs into the aforementioned techniques and others, such as encouraging sustainability, improving food safety, and finding more humane ways to raise livestock. "This is the story of the innovators and innovations shaping the future of food," he explains. He admits that genetically modified food is a controversial topic, but points out that humans have "been altering our food and innovating new diets since the beginning." If his enthusiasm for hamburgers from bovine stem cells or "convenient, healthy, and scrumptious" printed food becomes contagious, that's his intent: "If I accomplish nothing else with this book, I hope a few young people might see a new way to effect food change." While Lusk occasionally lapses into overly technical moments of scientific passion, he otherwise succeeds in keeping his book accessible, entertaining, and optimistic. Agent: Mel Berger, William Morris Endeavor. (Apr.)

 
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