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An Unquiet Mind
by Kay Redfield Jamison and Kay Redfield Jamison

Overview - From a leading international authority on manic-depressive illness—and one of only a handful of women who are full professors of medicine—comes a remarkable personal testimony: the revelation of her own struggle since childhood with manic-depression, and how it has shaped her life.  Read more...


 

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More About An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield Jamison; Kay Redfield Jamison
 
 
 
Overview

From a leading international authority on manic-depressive illness—and one of only a handful of women who are full professors of medicine—comes a remarkable personal testimony: the revelation of her own struggle since childhood with manic-depression, and how it has shaped her life.

 
Details
  • Publisher: Books on Tape
  • Date: Jan 2010
 
Excerpts

From the book


Into the Sun

I was standing with my head back, one pigtail caught between my teeth, listening to the jet overhead. The noise was loud, unusually so, which meant that it was close. My elementary school was near Andrews Air Force Base, just outside Washington; many of us were pilots' kids, so the sound was a matter of routine. Being routine, however, didn't take away from the magic, and I instinctively looked up from the playground to wave. I knew, of course, that the pilot couldn't see me-I always knew that-just as I knew that even if he could see me the odds were that it wasn't actually my father. But it was one of those things one did, and anyway I loved any and all excuses just to stare up into the skies. My father, a career Air Force officer, was first and foremost a scientist and only secondarily a pilot. But he loved to fly, and, because he was a meteorologist, both his mind and his soul ended up being in the skies. Like my father, I looked up rather more than I looked out.

When I would say to him that the Navy and the Army were so much older than the Air Force, had so much more tradition and legend, he would say, Yes, that's true, but the Air Force is the future. Then he would always add: And-we can fly. This statement of creed would occasionally be followed by an enthusiastic rendering of the Air Force song, fragments of which remain with me to this day, nested together, somewhat improbably, with phrases from Christmas carols, early poems, and bits and pieces of the Book of Common Prayer: all having great mood and meaning from childhood, and all still retaining the power to quicken the pulses.

So I would listen and believe and, when I would hear the words "Off we go into the wild blue yonder," I would think that "wild" and "yonder" were among the most wonderful words I had ever heard; likewise, I would feel the total exhilaration of the phrase "Climbing high, into the sun" and know instinctively that I was a part of those who loved the vastness of the sky.

The noise of the jet had become louder, and I saw the other children in my second-grade class suddenly dart their heads upward. The plane was coming in very low, then it streaked past us, scarcely missing the playground. As we stood there clumped together and absolutely terrified, it flew into the trees, exploding directly in front of us. The ferocity of the crash could be felt and heard in the plane's awful impact; it also could be seen in the frightening yet terrible lingering loveliness of the flames that followed. Within minutes, it seemed, mothers were pouring onto the playground to reassure children that it was not their fathers; fortunately for my brother and sister and myself, it was not ours either. Over the next few days it became clear, from the release of the young pilot's final message to the control tower before he died, that he knew he could save his own life by bailing out. He also knew, however, that by doing so he risked that his unaccompanied plane would fall onto the playground and kill those of us who were there.

The dead pilot became a hero, transformed into a scorchingly vivid, completely impossible ideal for what was meant by the concept of duty. It was an impossible ideal, but all the more compelling and haunting because of its very unobtainability. The memory of the crash came back to me many times over the years, as a reminder both of how one aspires after and needs such ideals, and of how killingly difficult it is to achieve them. I never again looked at the sky and saw only vastness and beauty. From that afternoon on I saw that death was also and always there.

Although, like all military families, we moved a lot-by the fifth grade my older...

 
Reviews

"An invaluable memoir of manic depression, at once medically knowledgeable, deeply human and beautifully written . . . at times poetic, at times straightforward, always unashamedly honest." - The New York Times Book Review

"Stands alone in the literature of manic-depression for its bravery, brilliance and beauty." - Oliver Sacks

"Jamison's [strength] is in the gutsy way she has made her disease her life's work and in her brilliant ability to convey its joys and its anguish. . . . Extraordinary." - Washington Post Book World

"The most emotionally moving book I've ever read about the emotions." - William Safire, The New York Times Magazine

"Written with poetic and moving sensitivity . . . a rare and insightful view of mental illness from inside the mind of a trained specialist." - Time

"Enlighting . . . eloquent and profound." - San Francisco Chronicle

"Piercingly honest. . . . Jamison's literary coming-out is a mark of courage." - People

"Brave, insightful, richly textured and chillingly authentic." - Boston Globe

"A riveting portrayal of a courageous brain alternating between exhilarating highs and numbing lows." - James D. Watson, Nobel laureate and author of The Double Helix

"In a most intimate and powerful telling, Jamison weaves the personal and professional threads of her life together. . . . [She] brings us inside the disease and helps us understand manic depression. . . . What comes through is a remarkably whole person with the grit to defeat her disease." - Cleveland Plain Dealer

"A riveting read. I devoured it at a single sitting and found the book almost as compelling on a second read. . . . An Unquiet Mind may well become a classic. . . . Jamison sets an example of courage." - Howard Gardner, Nature

"Stunning. . . . [An] exquisite (in both a literary and medical sense) autobiography. . . . This is an important, wonderful book." - Jackson Clarion Ledger

"Extraordinary. . . . An Unquiet Mind must be read." - The New England Journal of Medicine

"A beautiful, funny, original book. Powerfully written, it is a wonderful and important account of mercurial moods and madness. I absolutely love this book." - Pat Conroy, author of The Prince of Tides

"A landmark. . . . The combination of the intensity of her personal life and the intellectual rigor of her professional experience make the book unique. . . . A vibrant and engaging account of the life, love and experience of a woman, a therapist, an academic, and a patient." - British Medical Journal

"Affecting, honest, touching . . . fluid, felt and often lyrical." - Will Self, The Observer (London)

"Quite astonishing. . . . Cuts through the dead jargon and detached observations of psychiatric theory and practice to create a fiery, passionate, authentic account of the devastation and exaltation, the blindness and illumination of the psychotic experience." - The Sunday Times (London)

"Rises to the poetic and has a mystical touch. . . . A courageous and fascinating book, a moving account of the life of a remarkable woman." - The Daily Telegraph (London)

"Fast-paced, startlingly honest and frequently lyrical. . . . Jamison has] a novelist's openness of phrase and talent for bringing character alive." - Scotland on Sunday

"Superbly written. . . . A compelling work of literature." - Independent on Sunday (London)

 
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