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The Vanquished : Why the First World War Failed to End
by Robert Gerwarth


Overview -

An epic, groundbreaking account of the ethnic and state violence that followed the end of World War I conflicts that would shape the course of the twentieth century

For the Western Allies, November 11, 1918, has always been a solemn date the end of fighting that had destroyed a generation, but also a vindication of a terrible sacrifice with the total collapse of the principal enemies: the German Empire, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire.  Read more...


 
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More About The Vanquished by Robert Gerwarth
 
 
 
Overview

An epic, groundbreaking account of the ethnic and state violence that followed the end of World War I conflicts that would shape the course of the twentieth century

For the Western Allies, November 11, 1918, has always been a solemn date the end of fighting that had destroyed a generation, but also a vindication of a terrible sacrifice with the total collapse of the principal enemies: the German Empire, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire. But for much of the rest of Europe this was a day with no meaning, as a continuing, nightmarish series of conflicts engulfed country after country.

In The Vanquished, a highly original and gripping work of history, Robert Gerwarth asks us to think again about the true legacy of the First World War. In large part it was not the fighting on the Western Front that proved so ruinous to Europe s future, but the devastating aftermath, as countries on both sides of the original conflict were savaged by revolutions, pogroms, mass expulsions, and further major military clashes. In the years immediately after the armistice, millions would die across central, eastern, and southeastern Europe before the Soviet Union and a series of rickety and exhausted small new states would come into being. It was here, in the ruins of Europe, that extreme ideologies such as fascism would take shape and ultimately emerge triumphant.

As absorbing in its drama as it is unsettling in its analysis, The Vanquished is destined to transform our understanding of not just the First World War but the twentieth century as a whole.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780374282455
  • ISBN-10: 0374282455
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publish Date: November 2016
  • Page Count: 464
  • Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.65 pounds


Related Categories

Books > History > Military - World War I
Books > History > Europe - General
Books > History > Modern - 20th Century

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-09-26
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this controversial, persuasive, and impressively documented book, Gerwarth (Hitlers Hangman), professor of modern history at University College Dublin, analyzes a war that was supposed to end war, yet was followed by no peace, only continuous violence. The wars nature changed in its final years: Russia underwent a revolution, and the Western Allies committed themselves to breaking up the continental empires. The postwar violence was more ungovernable than the state-legitimated version of the preceding century. Gerwarth establishes his case in three contexts. The Central Powers, Germany and Austria-Hungary, enjoyed a taste of victory in the winter of 191718, only to suffer the shock of seeing their military, political, and diplomatic positions quickly collapse. Russias revolution immersed Eastern Europe in what seemed a forever war of only fleeting democratic triumphs. Fear of Bolshevism in turn stimulated the rise of fascism. And the Versailles negotiations proved unable to control the collapse of prewar empires, much less guide their reconstruction along proto-Wilsonian lines. The period of relative stability after 1923 was a function of exhaustion rather than reconstruction, Gerwarth ruefully notes, and by 1929 Europe was plunging back once again into crisis and violent disorder that set the stage for the Great Wars second round. Maps & illus. Agent: Andrew Wylie, Wylie Agency. (Nov.)

 
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