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Very Bad Poetry
by Kathryn Petras and Ross Petras


Overview - Writing very bad poetry requires talent. It helps to have a wooden ear for words, a penchant for sinking into a mire of sentimentality, and an enviable confidence that allows one to write despite absolutely appalling incompetence.

The 131 poems collected in this first-of-its-kind anthology are so glaringly awful that they embody a kind of genius.
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More About Very Bad Poetry by Kathryn Petras; Ross Petras
 
 
 
Overview
Writing very bad poetry requires talent. It helps to have a wooden ear for words, a penchant for sinking into a mire of sentimentality, and an enviable confidence that allows one to write despite absolutely appalling incompetence.

The 131 poems collected in this first-of-its-kind anthology are so glaringly awful that they embody a kind of genius. From Fred Emerson Brooks' "The Stuttering Lover" to Matthew Green's "The Spleen" to Georgia Bailey Parrington's misguided "An Elegy to a Dissected Puppy", they mangle meter, run rampant over rhyme, and bludgeon us into insensibility with their grandiosity, anticlimax, and malapropism.

Guaranteed to move even the most stoic reader to tears (of laughter), Very Bad Poetry is sure to become a favorite of the poetically inclined (and disinclined).


This item is Non-Returnable.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780679776222
  • ISBN-10: 0679776222
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • Publish Date: April 1997
  • Page Count: 144
  • Dimensions: 7.5 x 4.52 x 0.46 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.27 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > Anthologies (multiple authors)
Books > Humor > General

 
BookPage Reviews

Not all poets can write well. In fact, some who have a compulsion to write verse have no sense of their lack of ability. Very Bad Poetry, edited by Kathryn Petras and Ross Petras, acquaints us with many of these poets and also others, William Wordsworth and James Whitcomb Riley, who had bad writing days. The reader should know that "Death, preferably by disaster, is a favorite topic of very bad poets. They eagerly and cheerfully share with their audience every lurid detail." Several of James McIntyre's "cheese odes" are here including one about an actual cheese that weighed over four tons. There is an anonymous poem, "Ode to a Ditch," and "Song of the Three Hundred Thousand Drunkards in the United States," one of many dealing with moral rectitude. The editors even select "The Worst Poem Ever Written in the English Language."

Reviewed by Roger Bishop.

 
BAM Customer Reviews