Coupon
The Way of Boys : Raising Healthy Boys in a Challenging and Complex World
by Anthony Rao and Michelle Seaton


Overview -

The Way of Boys by renowned psychologist Dr. Anthony Rao is an important wake-up call to the dangers of over-medicating our male children and our current tendency to treat their active boyhood as an illness. Dr. Rao raises a much-needed alarm in this essential volume that belongs in every parent's collection alongside Raising Cain by Michael Thompson.  Read more...


 
Hardcover
  • $25.99

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

Free Shipping is not available for this item.
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 32 copies from $2.99
 
Download

This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

More About The Way of Boys by Anthony Rao; Michelle Seaton
 
 
 
Overview

The Way of Boys by renowned psychologist Dr. Anthony Rao is an important wake-up call to the dangers of over-medicating our male children and our current tendency to treat their active boyhood as an illness. Dr. Rao raises a much-needed alarm in this essential volume that belongs in every parent's collection alongside Raising Cain by Michael Thompson. In these time when many parents, concerned about ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, and bipolar disorder, may be dangerously misinterpreting their young sons' healthy, normal development process, The Way of Boys is must reading.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061707827
  • ISBN-10: 0061707821
  • Publisher: William Morrow & Company
  • Publish Date: September 2009
  • Page Count: 304
  • Dimensions: 9.06 x 6.3 x 1.09 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.02 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Psychology > Developmental - Child
Books > Family & Relationships > Parenting - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 59.
  • Review Date: 2009-08-17
  • Reviewer: Staff

Rao, a psychologist who has worked with young boys for two decades at Harvard Medical School as well as in private practice, claims that very young boys are being misdiagnosed with disorders such as ADHD and Asperger's and are often unnecessarily treated with medications that, he believes, should be a last resort (some boys, he notes, have even been thrown out of preschool for unruly behavior). With writer Seaton, Rao argues that many young boys who grab, kick, fidget, act out in school or refuse to make eye contact are simply being true to their brain development and hardwiring; in the vast majority of cases, Rao claims, these behaviors are healthy and normal, and shouldn't require medical intervention. The authors explain that boys do best with tactile, hands-on learning and more physical movement than most schools provide. Rather than rush to label and diagnose, Rao recommends a wait-and-see approach, noting that most behavior problems are temporary developmental glitches (with the exception of autism, which benefits from early intervention). Rao offers strategies parents can employ to help their youngsters learn to communicate, socialize and deal with anger and other issues. Though a bit heavy on the case studies, Rao's text is a valuable resource for readers determining whether to seek a medical diagnosis and a prescription or opt for a behavioral plan and a strong dose of patience. (Sept.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews