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What Hath God Wrought : The Transformation of America, 1815-1848
by Daniel Walker Howe


Overview - Historian Howe illuminates the period of American history from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent.  Read more...

 
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More About What Hath God Wrought by Daniel Walker Howe
 
 
 
Overview
Historian Howe illuminates the period of American history from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780195078947
  • ISBN-10: 0195078942
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publish Date: October 2007
  • Page Count: 904
  • Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 2.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.15 pounds

Series: Oxford History of the United States (Hardcover)

Related Categories

Books > History > United States - 19th Century

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 45.
  • Review Date: 2007-06-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

In the latest installment in the Oxford History of the United States series, historian Howe, professor emeritus at Oxford University and UCLA (The Political Culture of the American Whigs), stylishly narrates a crucial period in U.S. history—a time of territorial growth, religious revival, booming industrialization, a recalibrating of American democracy and the rise of nationalist sentiment. Smaller but no less important stories run through the account: New York’s gradual emancipation of slaves; the growth of higher education; the rise of the temperance movement (all classes, even ministers, imbibed heavily, Howe says). Howe also charts developments in literature, focusing not just on Thoreau and Poe but on such forgotten writers as William Gilmore Simms of South Carolina, who “helped create the romantic image of the Old South,” but whose proslavery views eventually brought his work into disrepute. Howe dodges some of the shibboleths of historical literature, for example, refusing to describe these decades as representing a “market revolution” because a market economy already existed in 18th-century America. Supported by engaging prose, Howe’s achievement will surely be seen as one of the most outstanding syntheses of U.S. history published this decade. 30 photos, 6 maps. (Sept.)

 
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