(0)
 
What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
by David Disalvo and Wray Herbert

Overview - This book reveals a remarkable paradox: what your brain wants is frequently not what your brain needs. In fact, much of what makes our brains "happy" leads to errors, biases, and distortions, which make getting out of our own way extremely difficult.  Read more...

 
Paperback
  • Retail Price: $19.00
  • $12.92
    (Save 32%)

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock. Usually ships within 24 hours.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
Not a member? Join Today!
 
 
New & Used Marketplace 37 copies from $7.25
 
 
 

More About What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite by David Disalvo; Wray Herbert
 
 
 
Overview
This book reveals a remarkable paradox: what your brain wants is frequently not what your brain needs. In fact, much of what makes our brains "happy" leads to errors, biases, and distortions, which make getting out of our own way extremely difficult.
Author David DiSalvo presents evidence from evolutionary and social psychology, cognitive science, neurology, and even marketing and economics. And he interviews many of the top thinkers in psychology and neuroscience today. From this research-based platform, DiSalvo draws out insights that we can use to identify our brains' foibles and turn our awareness into edifying action. Ultimately, he argues, the research does not serve up ready-made answers, but provides us with actionable clues for overcoming the plight of our advanced brains and, consequently, living more fulfilled lives.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781616144838
  • ISBN-10: 1616144831
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publish Date: November 2011
  • Page Count: 309


Related Categories

Books > Psychology > Cognitive Psychology & Cognition
Books > Psychology > Neuropsychology

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-10-24
  • Reviewer: Staff

Science writer DiSalvo analyzes the relationship between human consciousness and our brains, challenging the notion we should make important decisions with our brains before conscious thought has a chance to weigh in. As he argues: "Our brains are prediction and pattern detection machines that desire stability, clarity, and consistency—which is terrific, except when it's not." Our brains evolved to help us survive in less complex situations where rapid decision making was often a matter of life and death. We like to feel that we're in a charge of a situation, and dislike uncertainty. DiSalvo provides many examples to bolster his argument that it's important to train ourselves not to respond too quickly to our impulses—jumping to unwarranted conclusions, failing to consider the long-term ramifications of our actions, and overestimating our ability to control our impulses, from overeating to addiction. But, he believes, the final decision remains with us, even though "wrestling with the stubborn tendencies of the happy brain is at times frustrating, exhausting, and even infuriating," if we're to live meaningful lives. This lively presentation of the latest in cognitive science convincingly debunks what DiSalvo calls "self-help snake oil." (Nov.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews

DISCUSSION