Coupon
What Soldiers Do : Sex and the American GI in World War II France
by Mary Louise Roberts


Overview - How do you convince men to charge across heavily mined beaches into deadly machine-gun fire? Do you appeal to their bonds with their fellow soldiers, their patriotism, their desire to end tyranny and mass murder? Certainly--but if you're the US Army in 1944, you also try another tack: you dangle the lure of beautiful French women, waiting just on the other side of the wire, ready to reward their liberators in oh so many ways.  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $30.00

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

Free Shipping is not available for this item.
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 23 copies from $9.50
 
 
 

More About What Soldiers Do by Mary Louise Roberts
 
 
 
Overview
How do you convince men to charge across heavily mined beaches into deadly machine-gun fire? Do you appeal to their bonds with their fellow soldiers, their patriotism, their desire to end tyranny and mass murder? Certainly--but if you're the US Army in 1944, you also try another tack: you dangle the lure of beautiful French women, waiting just on the other side of the wire, ready to reward their liberators in oh so many ways.
That's not the picture of the Greatest Generation that we've been given, but it's the one Mary Louise Roberts paints to devastating effect in What Soldiers Do. Drawing on an incredible range of sources, including news reports, propaganda and training materials, official planning documents, wartime diaries, and memoirs, Roberts tells the fascinating and troubling story of how the US military command systematically spread--and then exploited--the myth of French women as sexually experienced and available. The resulting chaos--ranging from flagrant public sex with prostitutes to outright rape and rampant venereal disease--horrified the war-weary and demoralized French population. The sexual predation, and the blithe response of the American military leadership, also caused serious friction between the two nations just as they were attempting to settle questions of long-term control over the liberated territories and the restoration of French sovereignty.
While never denying the achievement of D-Day, or the bravery of the soldiers who took part, What Soldiers Do reminds us that history is always more useful--and more interesting--when it is most honest, and when it goes beyond the burnished beauty of nostalgia to grapple with the real lives and real mistakes of the people who lived it.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780226923093
  • ISBN-10: 0226923096
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publish Date: May 2013
  • Page Count: 351
  • Dimensions: 9.31 x 6.23 x 1.01 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.41 pounds


Related Categories

Books > History > Military - World War II
Books > History > Europe - France
Books > History > Military - United States

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-04-08
  • Reviewer: Staff

This clear-eyed examination of what randy American soldiers got up to in France from D-Day through 1946 strips away the sentimentality from the overworked, clichéd portrayal of the Greatest Generation. Yes, the GIs fought, and fought well, University of Wisconsin historian Roberts (Disruptive Acts: The New Woman in Fin de Siècle France) acknowledges, but when they weren’t engaging the enemy, they were engaging—or trying to engage—local women. As Roberts shows, the soldiers didn’t always conduct themselves well when pursuing French members of the opposite sex, and they didn’t always seek consent: to some GIs, their invasion of France entitled them to possess mesdemoiselles as well as le territoire. Roberts zeroes in on three kinds of interactions between GIs and French women—romance, prostitution, and rape—to explore the larger political and martial power struggles between the allied nations of France and the U.S. In the end, of course, the former regained its autonomy, but its men were portrayed as emasculated for their inability to save their country and their women, and France’s international power declined. Roberts convincingly argues, in this focused, alternative military history, that libidinous American GIs played an important role in that shift. 23 b&w illus. (June)

 
BAM Customer Reviews