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Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? : Fitness Myths, Training Truths, and Other Surprising Discoveries from the Science of Exercise
by Alex Hutchinson


Overview - In Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? Alex Hutchinson, a physicist, award-winning journalist, and contributing editor of Popular Mechanics magazine, reveals the little-known and often surprising truths that science has uncovered about exercise.  Read more...

 
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More About Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? by Alex Hutchinson
 
 
 
Overview
In Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? Alex Hutchinson, a physicist, award-winning journalist, and contributing editor of Popular Mechanics magazine, reveals the little-known and often surprising truths that science has uncovered about exercise. A book that ranges from cardio and weights to competition and weight loss, here are fascinating facts and practical tips for fitness buffs, competitive athletes, and popular science fans alike.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780062007537
  • ISBN-10: 006200753X
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
  • Publish Date: May 2011
  • Page Count: 317
  • Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Health & Fitness > Exercise
Books > Health & Fitness > Healthy Living

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-07-11
  • Reviewer: Staff

This wide-ranging book covers far more than its title promises. Beyond the cardio/weight debate, Hutchinson covers fitness gear, physiology, flexibility, aging, injury, weight management, and the mental aspects of exercise in this question-and-answer-style offering. Hutchinson, editor at Popular Mechanics and Canadian Running and columnist for the Toronto Globe and Mail, is certainly a subject matter expert and a thorough researcher, clearly explaining scientific concepts for the average reader. He doesn't promote snake-oil paths to fitness, but rather promises and provides up-to-date, research-based health and fitness news. He touches on trends like barefoot running and Wii workouts and includes fitness oddities like the risk of water intoxication. End-of-chapter cheat sheets and helpful boxes, charts, and graphics will be more immediately salient to most readers than literature-review-centric body text, which sometimes feels prohibitively citation-laden. This book will work best when occasionally dipped into or when referenced in answering a specific question; a cover-to-cover read feels dense and overlong. Still, it will also be enjoyed by cerebral athletes who want the why behind the workouts. (June)

 
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