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Whose Eye Am I?
by Shelley Rotner


Overview - Who am I? ask captions alongside close-ups of colorful animal eyes. As readers guess which animal belongs to each eye, they will discover that each animal has a unique and amazing way of seeing. Snakes have clear eyelids that cannot ever open or close.  Read more...

 
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More About Whose Eye Am I? by Shelley Rotner
 
 
 
Overview
Who am I? ask captions alongside close-ups of colorful animal eyes. As readers guess which animal belongs to each eye, they will discover that each animal has a unique and amazing way of seeing. Snakes have clear eyelids that cannot ever open or close. Some sea creatures have hundreds of eyes around the edges of their shells. Many animals can see colors that are invisible to humans. Brimming with vivid and engaging photographs, this book also includes a clear explanation of how human eyes work, a labeled diagram of a human eye, a glossary and an index."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780823435586
  • ISBN-10: 082343558X
  • Publisher: Holiday House
  • Publish Date: January 2016
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 5-8
  • Dimensions: 8.6 x 9.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.7 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Animals - General
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Science & Nature - Anatomy & Physiology
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Science & Nature - Zoology

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-11-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

Rotner (Families) invites readers to identify animalsincluding a cat, owl, alligator, lobster, and dragonflyby looking at close-up photographs of their eyes. After each animals identity is revealed, Rotner describes its visual acuity (Bearded dragons see in full color and can see some colors that are invisible to us. Their eyes are on either side of their heads, so they see on both sides at once) before touching on the vision of other mammals, birds, fish, and insects. The language is direct and the layout bare-bones, but the photographs are eye-catching, no pun intended, and readers will walk away with interesting tidbits about how animals, including humans, see the world. Ages 59. (Feb.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews