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Winnie : The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-The-Pooh
by Sally M. Walker and Jonathan D. Voss


Overview -

Who could care for a bear?

When Harry Colebourn saw a baby bear for sale at the train station, he knew he could care for it. Harry was a veterinarian. But he was also a soldier in training for World War I.
Harry named the bear Winnie, short for Winnipeg, his company's home town, and he brought her along to the training camp in England.  Read more...


 
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More About Winnie by Sally M. Walker; Jonathan D. Voss
 
 
 
Overview

Who could care for a bear?

When Harry Colebourn saw a baby bear for sale at the train station, he knew he could care for it. Harry was a veterinarian. But he was also a soldier in training for World War I.
Harry named the bear Winnie, short for Winnipeg, his company's home town, and he brought her along to the training camp in England. Winnie followed Harry everywhere and slept under his cot every night. Before long, she became the regiment's much-loved mascot.
But who could care for the bear when Harry had to go to the battleground in France? Harry found just the right place for Winnie while he was away the London Zoo. There a little boy named Christopher Robin came along and played with Winnie he could care for this bear too
Sally Walker's heartwarming story, paired with Jonathan Voss's evocative illustrations, brings to life the story of the real bear who inspired Winnie the Pooh."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780805097153
  • ISBN-10: 0805097155
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company
  • Publish Date: January 2015
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.7 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Animals - Mammals
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Animals - Zoos
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-11-10
  • Reviewer: Staff

Walker (Freedom Song) provides a concise, affecting account of the story behind the bear that sparked the creation of Winnie-the-Pooh. The heart of the story is the relationship between Winnie (short for Winnipeg) and Harry Colebourn, a WWII Canadian Veterinary Corps soldier who impulsively bought the young orphaned bear at an Ontario train station. Making a memorable debut, Voss highlights Winnie’s playful personality, as well as the close bond between her and Colebourn (an especially sweet sequence shows Winnie digging through the soldier’s uniform as they play her favorite game, “hide-and-seek biscuits”). Subtle sepia tones give the nostalgic pen, ink, and watercolor illustrations the feel of period photographs (actual period photos are also included). When Colebourn ships out to care for wounded horses in France, he finds her a new home at the London Zoo. This bittersweet separation has a gratifying resolution: Winnie easily adjusts to life among the other bears and makes friends with young zoo visitors—including the son of A.A. Milne, whose books made Winnie a celebrity in her lifetime. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Catherine Drayton, Inkwell Management. (Jan.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Willy, nilly, silly old bear

Sally M. Walker likes to connect young readers with history. In her new picture book, Winnie, she does just that, telling the little-known story of the real bear who inspired A.A. Milne’s legendary children’s book character, Winnie-the-Pooh. 

When World War I soldier and veterinarian Harry Colebourn first saw the bear for sale at a train station in Canada, he knew he was the one to take care of her. He named her Winnipeg (later shortened to “Winnie”) after the capital city of Manitoba. When he was transferred to a training camp in England, he brought Winnie with him. She became a beloved member of Colebourn’s regiment, though in 1919 he donated her with a heavy heart to the London Zoo. It was there that a young boy named Christopher Robin first visited her. And the rest is literary history.

 
BAM Customer Reviews