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The Wreath Recipe Book : Year-Round Wreaths, Swags, and Other Decorations to Make with Seasonal Branches
by Alethea Harampolis and Jill Rizzo


Overview -

From the authors of the widely popular Flower Recipe Book , and in the same successful format, The Wreath Recipe Book provides 100 "recipes" to make with flowering and leafy branches. These aren't just evergreens for Christmas--the book is organized seasonally, with dozens of projects to make throughout the year.  Read more...


 
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More About The Wreath Recipe Book by Alethea Harampolis; Jill Rizzo
 
 
 
Overview

From the authors of the widely popular Flower Recipe Book, and in the same successful format, The Wreath Recipe Book provides 100 "recipes" to make with flowering and leafy branches. These aren't just evergreens for Christmas--the book is organized seasonally, with dozens of projects to make throughout the year.In the spring, a cherry blossom bough gets a touch of whimsy with a colorful ribbon, and a tabletop is adorned with lilacs and olive branches. In the summer, a garland features sage with pomegranates and citrus-colored strawflowers. In the fall, wreaths are created with magnolias, rosemary, and plums, and gourds are used to create an unexpected garland. Winter highlights cedar, pine, and juniper, yielding unexpected table settings and new wreath shapes. There are detailed ingredient lists and hundreds of step-by-step photos as well as chapters covering basic techniques, sourcing, and care information.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781579655594
  • ISBN-10: 1579655599
  • Publisher: Artisan Publishers
  • Publish Date: October 2014
  • Page Count: 269

Series: Recipe Book

Related Categories

Books > Crafts & Hobbies > Flower Arranging
Books > Crafts & Hobbies > Nature Crafts
Books > Crafts & Hobbies > Seasonal

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-08-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

Harampolis and Rizzo, cofounders of the San Francisco floral design company Studio Choo, offer a collection of garlands, abstract arrangements, and the titular wreaths for every season. From the cherry blossoms and sweet peas of spring to the blackberry and lavender wreaths of summer, from gourd garlands in autumn to blonde blossoms of acacia and pastel camellia of winter, there is a recipe for the nontraditional on every page. Many wreaths include “ingredients” which can be removed and planted (succulents that have been used in summer arrangements) or repurposed (lavender hung upside down as a garland provides a jump on a future use as dried component). Framing their ideas as recipes, the authors assure the reader that anyone who can understand how to make lasagna can also make an ethereal crown of juniper, orchid, and air plants. A generous total of 400 color photos will leave the reader hungry for another container of persimmon branches. (Oct.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Lifestyles: Put a wreath on it

There are few better ways to celebrate the cycle of the seasons than through decorative wreaths. The Wreath Recipe Book inspires readers to design an array of living sculptures to hang on your wall, door or ceiling throughout the year—or, alternatively, to use the same ingredients to make arrangements for shelves and tables. As owners of a popular design company in San Francisco, authors Alethea Harampolis and Jill Rizzo are ideal guides for launching year-round adventures in wreath making. Starting with suggested tools (wires, frames and cutters of every kind), they take you step-by-step through the building of any wreath using branches, stems, leaves and flowers with hundreds of pages of “recipes” for spring, summer, fall and winter—each holding in sweet suspension the fleeting pleasures of its particular season. My favorite set calls for a garland, vase or wreath of blackberry branches. These are the perfect projects to bring the season-by-season splendor of the outdoors into your home. 

FORM AND FUNCTION
In just one little book, Susie Hodge has brought together the most impressive triumphs of commercial design spanning the last century and more. Her pint-sized When Design Really Works explains how success is a byproduct of the union between inspired design and plain old commercial appeal. Whether it’s a deceptively comfortable modernist chair or the Zippo cigarette lighter (which might kill you eventually, but at least you’ll die a well-designed death), these artifacts define the absolute harmony between art and commerce. Instead of names of items, the title of each section presents what the item stands for: “Elegance,” “Sinuousness,” “Grace,” “Poise,” “Extravagance,” etc., all under the larger rubric of “BEAUTY” (the first among 10 big ideas). I don’t think I’ve ever seen this many grandiose ideas crammed into such a compact volume. Believe it or not, LEGO® is all about compatibility and expression—a rather highbrow children’s toy, indeed. I just thought the bricks were fun to play with, but now I have a theoretical framework! This little book is such a nerdy treat.

TOP PICK IN LIFESTYLES
“We like working with everyday items.” That’s music to my ears. Oh, the clever beauties you craft in your own home, out of tea bags and tea towels and coffee beans; pillboxes and candy and weeds from the yard. Anything and everything is fair game in Make & Give: Simple and Modern Crafts to Brighten Every Day. Authors Steph Hung and Erin Jang lay out 35 projects with lists of cheap materials, simple instructions, great photos and helpful templates (along with the personal inspiration behind each project) that yield never fussy, always appealing and sometimes funny and sweet gifts: like the Secret Love Note Shirt with a message ironed on the inside, or the board games with pieces made of candy. Because each object is conceived as a present for a special someone—cards, prints, temporary tattoos, personal storybooks—each one is naturally a labor of love.

 

This article was originally published in the December 2014 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 
BAM Customer Reviews