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The Faith : What Christians Believe, Why They Believe It, and Why It Matters
by Charles Colson and Harold Fickett

Overview - In this powerful book, Colson and Fickett identify the unshakable tenets of the faith that Christians have believed through the centuries--truths that offer a ground for faith in uncertain times, hope and joy for those who despair, and reconciliation for a world at war with God and itself.  Read more...

 
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More About The Faith by Charles Colson; Harold Fickett
 
 
 
Overview
In this powerful book, Colson and Fickett identify the unshakable tenets of the faith that Christians have believed through the centuries--truths that offer a ground for faith in uncertain times, hope and joy for those who despair, and reconciliation for a world at war with God and itself.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780310276036
  • ISBN-10: 0310276039
  • Publisher: Zondervan Publishing Company
  • Publish Date: February 2008
  • Page Count: 240


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Faith
Books > Religion > Christian Theology - Apologetics
Books > Religion > Christian Life - Spiritual Growth

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 59.
  • Review Date: 2008-01-28
  • Reviewer: Staff

Longtime collaborators Colson and Fickett address the very tenets of the Christian faith in order “to renew ourselves as Christians and the Church as God's people.” Generally they do this well, first offering an overview of challenges facing the church and then moving on to specific core issues. Chapter builds on chapter, from “God Is” to “He Has Spoken” to “Truth” and so on to “Last Things.” Especially thought-provoking is the question of why so many people accuse the Christian faith of being “dry and brittle.” One answer, the authors say, is the church's “failure to teach what the faith is.” Colson and Fickett call the church to rediscover the “joy of orthodoxy,” to renew the surrounding culture and to rethink how we live out faith. “If there's ever been a time in which renewal was essential, it is today,” they say. Those who know Colson's work will appreciate his pointed statements and bold words, while those looking for subtle shadings of doctrinal issues may be aghast at the lack thereof. The book's strength lies not in minutiae but in opening the discussion on orthodoxy and what living as a Christian means by going back to faith's beginnings. (Mar.)

 
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