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O Me of Little Faith : True Confessions of a Spiritual Weakling
by Jason Boyett

Overview - O Me of Little Faith is a brutally honest, frequently hilarious look at the struggles of a self-confessed spiritual weakling. Jason Boyett invites you to ask the hard questions and remain hopeful as he examines how you doubt, why you doubt, and what (if anything) should be done about it.  Read more...

 
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More About O Me of Little Faith by Jason Boyett
 
 
 
Overview
O Me of Little Faith is a brutally honest, frequently hilarious look at the struggles of a self-confessed spiritual weakling. Jason Boyett invites you to ask the hard questions and remain hopeful as he examines how you doubt, why you doubt, and what (if anything) should be done about it.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780310289494
  • ISBN-10: 0310289491
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publish Date: May 2010
  • Page Count: 223


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Christian Life - Spiritual Growth
Books > Religion > Faith

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-10-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Doubt can play an important role in a healthy spiritual life. This statement may seem counter-intuitive, but Boyett, popular speaker and author of Pocket Guide to the Afterlife, illustrates its truth through his own faith struggles. Grounded in Scripture and Christian history, the author provides examples of great religious thinkers who experienced their own trials of doubt about God, faith, and the church. But it is when he weaves in humorous, even poignant, autobiographical anecdotes that his writing springs to life. One fascinating highlight is the discussion regarding the "hidden God," a phrase used by many great religious figures to describe just how different God is from human categories and understanding. Ultimately, the author's point is clear: if there were no doubt, there would not be faith. The author is comfortable with a snarky, self-deprecating style that will appeal to the under-40 crowd, although older readers may not appreciate it. For anyone wrestling with doubt about religious faith, however, this memoir provides a chance to examine the experience with levity. (May)

 
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