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Unveiling Grace : The Story of How We Found Our Way Out of the Mormon Church
by Lynn K. Wilder

Overview - From a rare insider's point of view, Unveiling Grace looks at how Latter-day Saints are 'wooing our country' with their religion, lifestyle, and culture. It is also a gripping story of how an entire family, deeply enmeshed in Mormonism, found their way out and what they can tell others about their lives as faithful Mormons.  Read more...

 
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More About Unveiling Grace by Lynn K. Wilder
 
 
 
Overview
From a rare insider's point of view, Unveiling Grace looks at how Latter-day Saints are 'wooing our country' with their religion, lifestyle, and culture. It is also a gripping story of how an entire family, deeply enmeshed in Mormonism, found their way out and what they can tell others about their lives as faithful Mormons.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780310331124
  • ISBN-10: 0310331129
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publish Date: August 2013
  • Page Count: 367


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Religious
Books > Religion > Christianity - Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-07-08
  • Reviewer: Staff

Wilder’s memoir belongs to a new breed of ex-Mormon exposé. It’s not salacious. It’s not full of wild revelations. It’s not even particularly angry, though the former BYU professor and stake relief society president does express regret for the decades she spent as a Mormon. Now an evangelical Christian, she explains that her family’s decision to leave “the Mormon Lord” and embrace a “bigger God” was spurred by the unexpected defection of her most spiritually attuned son. While the tone of the book may represent a fresh direction in Mormon-evangelical relations, as memoirs go this account feels workmanlike, even plodding. It’s overly detailed, about 80 pages too long, and riddled with a surprising lack of narrative tension. The same elements are present in the author’s life at the Mormon beginning and the evangelical end—happy and close family, various miraculous experiences, stable lives, etc.—with the only differences being a move from Utah to Florida and an involvement in music and ministry to persuade the “dear Mormon people” of the truth of the biblical Jesus. (Aug. 20)

 
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