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Ballywhinney Girl
by Eve Bunting and Emily Arnold McCully

Overview - Maeve is unnerved when she and her grandfather find a body in the bog in Ballywhinney,
Ireland. It turns out to be the body of a young girl who lived more than a
thousand years ago. A girl like Maeve, with fair hair, who walked the same fields and
picked the same flowers.
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More About Ballywhinney Girl by Eve Bunting; Emily Arnold McCully
 
 
 
Overview
Maeve is unnerved when she and her grandfather find a body in the bog in Ballywhinney,
Ireland. It turns out to be the body of a young girl who lived more than a
thousand years ago. A girl like Maeve, with fair hair, who walked the same fields and
picked the same flowers. When archeologists display the mummy at a museum, Maeve
wonders: Does the girl mind being displayed in a glass case for all to see? Or does she
miss the green meadow where she had lain for so many hundreds of years?
Two picture-book masters sensitively capture the layers of thought and feeling arising
in the face of an awe-inspiring and mysterious discovery.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780547558431
  • ISBN-10: 0547558430
  • Publisher: Clarion Books
  • Publish Date: March 2012
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Girls & Women
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Historical - Europe
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Historical - Prehistory

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-01-02
  • Reviewer: Staff

In a haunting outing that treads on perhaps even more chilling turf than Bunting and McCully’s previous collaboration, The Banshee (2009), the author whisks readers to the expansive countryside of her native Ireland. It’s there, in a peat bog, that young Maeve and her grandfather make a startling discovery: the ancient mummified remains of a girl. Drama and suspense dovetail as the family and authorities follow procedures and come to grips with the significance of what they’ve found. “I wasn’t sure exactly how I felt,” Maeve thinks. “There was fear/ and curiosity,/ but there was more./ Something I could not/ put my name to.” McCully’s watercolor-and-ink compositions offer a front-row seat to the proceedings, though readers get just a few glimpses of the mummy. Maeve’s delicately drawn face tells a tale all its own, filled with shock, concern, and sadness as she explores the connection she feels to the mummified girl. Though not for sensitive children, this memento mori has much to offer readers who are up to the challenge. An afterword provides information on the (fictional) story’s real-life inspiration. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)

 
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