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Objects of Worship
by Claude Lalumiere and Rupert Bottenberg and James Morrow


Overview - Twelve strange, eerie, sensual stories by a bold new voice in weird fiction. Capricious gods rule a world of women. Zombies breed human cattle. The son of a superhero must decide between his heritage and his religion. Young lovers worship a primordial spider god.  Read more...

 
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More About Objects of Worship by Claude Lalumiere; Rupert Bottenberg; James Morrow
 
 
 
Overview
Twelve strange, eerie, sensual stories by a bold new voice in weird fiction. Capricious gods rule a world of women. Zombies breed human cattle. The son of a superhero must decide between his heritage and his religion. Young lovers worship a primordial spider god. The apocalyptic rebirth of the god of the elephants . . .

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780981297828
  • ISBN-10: 098129782X
  • Publisher: Chizine Publications
  • Publish Date: October 2009
  • Page Count: 274
  • Reading Level: Ages 16-UP


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Fantasy - Collections & Anthologies

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 43.
  • Review Date: 2009-09-21
  • Reviewer: Staff

The strange is matter-of-factly mundane in Canadian author and editor Lalumière's collection of 10 reprinted and two original stories of the surreal and fantastic. Deities and spiritual grace are both unfathomably alien and somehow less than you might expect when Lucifer makes a deal with the phone company (“A Place Where Nothing Ever Happens”) and likewise in the title story, where keeping your gods satisfied is like caring for extra-finicky but disturbingly powerful cats. Lalumière's love of comic book heroes informs the antics of “Hochelaga and Sons,” “Spiderkid” and “Destroyer of Worlds,” and the daily lives of zombies set the stage for the blackly comedic “The Ethical Treatment of Meat” and “A Visit to the Optometrist.” Even when the plots aren't quite enough to carry Lalumière's curious ideas, they're still intensely memorable. (Nov.)

 
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