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Sea Borne - Thirty Years Avoyaging
by James B. Connoly

Overview - BOOK S BY JAMES B. CONNOLLY HISTORICAL Sea-Borne Canton Captain Master Mariner The Port of Gloucester Book of the Gloucester Fishermen Navy Men SHORT STORIES Out o Gloucester Deep Seas Toll Crested Seas Wide Courses Head Winds Running Free Open Water Tide Rips Sonnie Boys People N OVBLS The Seiners Jeb Hutton Hiker Joy Steel Decks boaster Captain An Olympic Victor SEA-BORtfE Thirty Years A voyaging By JAMES B.  Read more...

 
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More About Sea Borne - Thirty Years Avoyaging by James B. Connoly
 
 
 
Overview
BOOK S BY JAMES B. CONNOLLY HISTORICAL Sea-Borne Canton Captain Master Mariner The Port of Gloucester Book of the Gloucester Fishermen Navy Men SHORT STORIES Out o Gloucester Deep Seas Toll Crested Seas Wide Courses Head Winds Running Free Open Water Tide Rips Sonnie Boys People N OVBLS The Seiners Jeb Hutton Hiker Joy Steel Decks boaster Captain An Olympic Victor SEA-BORtfE Thirty Years A voyaging By JAMES B. CONNOLLY Doubleday, Doran and Company, Inc. GARDEN Grry, NEW YORK 1944 SEA-BORNE Thirty Years Avoyaging Chapter I AS FAR BACK as my father and mother knew, their people came 3f seafaring stock. They were Aran Islands folk islands that lie off the west coast of Ireland. It is a rough coast, and die Arans are little isles and almost solid rock which was one reason why so many men of those isles took to the sea. The lack of arable land left the sea as their best chance for a living. The Arans lie at the entrance to Galway Bay, and for centuries back Galway captains were sailing to Spanish ports. Aran tradition has it that a Galway Bay man sailed with Columbus on that first historic voyage of discovery and at least a dozen Aran Island families have it that the Irish sailor with Columbus was an ancestor of theirs. And almost any family of them could have the truth of it, my father used to say. He could be a Connolly before many of them, the Connollys of Galway being a numerous tribe and great rovers always. Or an ODonnell, my mother would add, she being an ODonnell. My father, no contentious man ever, would agree that the Aran ODonnells were great rovers too in their day. My father and mother left the Aran Isles and settled in Boston while still fairly young. They had married young hetwenty-five and she seventeen and they had twelve children altogether. My father went in for the fishing with the Boston fleet. My mothers brother, Jim, came to Boston with them, and he too took to the fishing, but with the Gloucester fleet. A few years later he was sailing with the Boston filing fleet as skipper and half-owner of a fine schooner. My father and mother had eight boys born to them in a row in Boston and we grew up in a maritime environment. My father and my uncle would come home from their fishing trips, and their notion of home being a place for a mans peace and quiet, they were nevafc 2 Sea-Borne ones for talk of dangers left behind them but a shoregoing neighbor or two would drop in, and they would ask questions and talk would come of the questioning, though even then there would be no playing up of any perilous happenings out to sea. They would talk as casually of hard black nights on the winter offshore fishing banks as an inquisitive neighbor would talk of his day in the city streets. What we listening children got of the danger of sea life was . that at times the wind blew hard hard meaning a Kving gale and also at times seas ran high masthead high might be incautiously slipped in but, hard wind or high sea, there was the able vessel with her sound gear always under their feet, and always there was the competent crew of men to handle her so, blow high or blow low, safe home she would bring them. So they would talk and yet, safe home they did not always come. One of my early recollections, a baby recollection almost, is of my uncle coming home to report the loss of the Little Kate, sister ship to his own vessel, she going down with all hands in a winter gale. Mostof that crew had been near-neighbors and I recall our mother having us go down on our knees and saying a rosary for the peace of their souls. Our mother wasnt for her sons going to sea when we grew up. My father would say Why not if they want to They could do worse. But my mother was the boss at home she was doing praying enough for her husband and her brother, let be having to pray for her sons on the wicked fishing banks when the wild winds would be blowing of a winters night ashore...


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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781406768947
  • ISBN-10: 1406768944
  • Publisher: Northup Press
  • Publish Date: March 2007
  • Page Count: 252


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