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The Abstract Wild
by Jack Turner




Overview -
How wild is wilderness and how wild are our experiences in it, asks Jack Turner in the pages of The Abstract Wild. His answer: not very wild. National parks and even so-called wilderness areas fall far short of offering the primal, mystic connection possible in wild places. And this is so, Turner avows, because any managed land, never mind what it's called, ceases to be wild. Moreover, what little wildness we have left is fast being destroyed by the very systems designed to preserve it. Natural resource managers, conservation biologists, environmental economists, park rangers, zoo directors, and environmental activists: Turner's book takes aim at these and all others who labor in the name of preservation. He argues for a new conservation ethic that focuses less on preserving things and more on preserving process and "leaving things be". He harshly criticizes zoos and wilderness tourism, and he cautions us to resist language that calls a tree "a resource" and wilderness "a management unit". Eloquent and fast paced, The Abstract Wild takes a long view to ask whether ecosystem management isn't "a bit of a sham" and the control of grizzlies and wolve "at best a travesty". Next, the author brings his readers up close for a look at issues surrounding pelicans, mountain lions, and Shamu the whale. From whatever angle, Turner stirs into his arguments the words of dozens of other American writers including Thoreau, Hemingway, Faulkner, and environmentalist Doug Peacock.

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Overview

How wild is wilderness and how wild are our experiences in it, asks Jack Turner in the pages of The Abstract Wild. His answer: not very wild. National parks and even so-called wilderness areas fall far short of offering the primal, mystic connection possible in wild places. And this is so, Turner avows, because any managed land, never mind what it's called, ceases to be wild. Moreover, what little wildness we have left is fast being destroyed by the very systems designed to preserve it. Natural resource managers, conservation biologists, environmental economists, park rangers, zoo directors, and environmental activists: Turner's book takes aim at these and all others who labor in the name of preservation. He argues for a new conservation ethic that focuses less on preserving things and more on preserving process and "leaving things be". He harshly criticizes zoos and wilderness tourism, and he cautions us to resist language that calls a tree "a resource" and wilderness "a management unit". Eloquent and fast paced, The Abstract Wild takes a long view to ask whether ecosystem management isn't "a bit of a sham" and the control of grizzlies and wolve "at best a travesty". Next, the author brings his readers up close for a look at issues surrounding pelicans, mountain lions, and Shamu the whale. From whatever angle, Turner stirs into his arguments the words of dozens of other American writers including Thoreau, Hemingway, Faulkner, and environmentalist Doug Peacock.


This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816516995
  • ISBN-10: 0816516995
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press
  • Publish Date: September 1996
  • Page Count: 160
  • Dimensions: 9.36 x 5.61 x 0.51 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.6 pounds


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