Arguing about Slavery : John Quincy Adams and the Great Battle in the United States Congress
by William Lee Miller


Overview - In the 1830s slavery was so deeply entrenched that it could not even be discussed in Congress, which had enacted a "gag rule" to ensure that anti-slavery petitions would be summarily rejected. This stirring book chronicles the parliamentary battle to bring "the peculiar institution" into the national debate, a battle that some historians have called "the Pearl Harbor of the slavery controversy." The campaign to make slavery officially and respectably debatable was waged by John Quincy Adams who spent nine years defying gags, accusations of treason, and assassination threats.  Read more...

 
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More About Arguing about Slavery by William Lee Miller
 
 
 
Overview
In the 1830s slavery was so deeply entrenched that it could not even be discussed in Congress, which had enacted a "gag rule" to ensure that anti-slavery petitions would be summarily rejected. This stirring book chronicles the parliamentary battle to bring "the peculiar institution" into the national debate, a battle that some historians have called "the Pearl Harbor of the slavery controversy." The campaign to make slavery officially and respectably debatable was waged by John Quincy Adams who spent nine years defying gags, accusations of treason, and assassination threats. In the end he made his case through a combination of cunning and sheer endurance. Telling this story with a brilliant command of detail, Arguing About Slavery endows history with majestic sweep, heroism, and moral weight.


"Dramatic, immediate, intensely readable, fascinating and often moving."--New York Times Book Review

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780679768449
  • ISBN-10: 0679768440
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • Publish Date: January 1998
  • Page Count: 592
  • Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.05 pounds


Related Categories

Books > History > United States - 19th Century
Books > Social Science > Ethnic Studies - African American Studies
Books > Political Science > American Government - General

 
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