menu

Careers in Meteorology and Atmospheric Science
by Institute for Career Research




Overview -
METEOROLOGY IS THE STUDY OF THE atmospheric conditions that cause weather on earth. Most of these conditions occur in the troposphere, the layer of the atmosphere closest to the earth. Meteorologists can predict future weather conditions by studying patterns in temperature, air pressure, and water vapor. The media, private sector companies, and government agencies use these predictions to manage air and ocean traffic, predict crop yield, budget water, and in many other important ways. Weather is everywhere and so are meteorologists. These professionals can be found all over the world doing all sorts of interesting things. Some study the ozone layer and look for ways to prevent air pollution or global climate change. Some monitor rainfall and issue flash flood warnings, or fly in specialized aircraft to investigate hurricanes. Most work for government agencies, such as the National Weather Service, providing vital information to the public as well as the aviation, marine, and fire control communities. Beyond the government, the fastest growing area for meteorologists is private forecasting. Private forecasters serve clients with very specific needs for highly specialized forecasts. For example, they might work for commodities traders who want to know how the weather will affect future crop production and prices. They might keep utility companies informed about impending hot or cold weather that will put heavy demands on generating plants and transmission systems. Weather forecasting is at the heart of meteorology. The weather forecast that you get in your hometown is the end product of a worldwide effort by thousands of meteorologists in many nations. All those meteorologists use tools such as Doppler radar, satellites, and instruments that take precise atmospheric measurements to follow and analyze the huge systems that will eventually bring us our local weather. To be eligible for most entry-level jobs as a meteorologist, you will need to have at least a bachelor's degree in meteorology or a related field. Along with the degree, you will need some experience pertaining to meteorology and related disciplines, such as thermodynamics, climatology, and even statistics and chemistry. Most people get that experience through student training programs and internships. Some are fortunate enough to find employers that offer on-the-job training either in-house or in the field. Aspiring meteorologists can expect favorable job prospects, especially in private industry. The federal government will still be the largest single employer, with particular emphasis on research related to global climate change. Considering the economic impact of weather - an estimated $3 trillion a year - it is not surprising that the fastest job growth will be in private industry. The opportunities for weather broadcasters are limited and highly competitive. Meteorology is a good choice for anyone with a passion for weather events, a head for math and science, and a desire to do work that benefits others. It is routinely ranked among the best jobs in America because it offers job security, little stress, plenty of employment options, and excellent compensation. There are numerous rewards for anyone with the sound knowledge of meteorology and the ability to use it in atmospheric research or applied meteorology. This new Careers Ebook contains a wealth of unbiased information about an occupational field, based on the latest national surveys. Careers Ebooks cover attractive and unattractive sides, opportunities, education necessary, personal qualifications required, earnings, descriptions of different job specialties, first person accounts by those in the field, and how to get started; including practical advice on what to do now. There are live links to schools and colleges, associations, periodicals and other sources of reliable information.

  Read Full Product Description
 
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
This item is Non-Returnable.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 7 copies from $10.32
 
 
 

More About Careers in Meteorology and Atmospheric Science by Institute for Career Research

 
 
 

Overview

METEOROLOGY IS THE STUDY OF THE atmospheric conditions that cause weather on earth. Most of these conditions occur in the troposphere, the layer of the atmosphere closest to the earth. Meteorologists can predict future weather conditions by studying patterns in temperature, air pressure, and water vapor. The media, private sector companies, and government agencies use these predictions to manage air and ocean traffic, predict crop yield, budget water, and in many other important ways. Weather is everywhere and so are meteorologists. These professionals can be found all over the world doing all sorts of interesting things. Some study the ozone layer and look for ways to prevent air pollution or global climate change. Some monitor rainfall and issue flash flood warnings, or fly in specialized aircraft to investigate hurricanes. Most work for government agencies, such as the National Weather Service, providing vital information to the public as well as the aviation, marine, and fire control communities. Beyond the government, the fastest growing area for meteorologists is private forecasting. Private forecasters serve clients with very specific needs for highly specialized forecasts. For example, they might work for commodities traders who want to know how the weather will affect future crop production and prices. They might keep utility companies informed about impending hot or cold weather that will put heavy demands on generating plants and transmission systems. Weather forecasting is at the heart of meteorology. The weather forecast that you get in your hometown is the end product of a worldwide effort by thousands of meteorologists in many nations. All those meteorologists use tools such as Doppler radar, satellites, and instruments that take precise atmospheric measurements to follow and analyze the huge systems that will eventually bring us our local weather. To be eligible for most entry-level jobs as a meteorologist, you will need to have at least a bachelor's degree in meteorology or a related field. Along with the degree, you will need some experience pertaining to meteorology and related disciplines, such as thermodynamics, climatology, and even statistics and chemistry. Most people get that experience through student training programs and internships. Some are fortunate enough to find employers that offer on-the-job training either in-house or in the field. Aspiring meteorologists can expect favorable job prospects, especially in private industry. The federal government will still be the largest single employer, with particular emphasis on research related to global climate change. Considering the economic impact of weather - an estimated $3 trillion a year - it is not surprising that the fastest job growth will be in private industry. The opportunities for weather broadcasters are limited and highly competitive. Meteorology is a good choice for anyone with a passion for weather events, a head for math and science, and a desire to do work that benefits others. It is routinely ranked among the best jobs in America because it offers job security, little stress, plenty of employment options, and excellent compensation. There are numerous rewards for anyone with the sound knowledge of meteorology and the ability to use it in atmospheric research or applied meteorology. This new Careers Ebook contains a wealth of unbiased information about an occupational field, based on the latest national surveys. Careers Ebooks cover attractive and unattractive sides, opportunities, education necessary, personal qualifications required, earnings, descriptions of different job specialties, first person accounts by those in the field, and how to get started; including practical advice on what to do now. There are live links to schools and colleges, associations, periodicals and other sources of reliable information.


This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781515321583
  • ISBN-10: 1515321584
  • Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publish Date: August 2015
  • Page Count: 34
  • Dimensions: 9.02 x 5.98 x 0.07 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.13 pounds


Related Categories

 

BAM Customer Reviews