menu

The Commentary of Zacharias Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism : On the Heidelberg Catechism - The Protestant Christian Doctrines, dating to 1563
by Zacharias Ursinus and G. W. Williard




Overview -

Zacharias Ursinus was a Reformed Christian theologian who authored the Heidelberg Catechism, an early Protestant document about faith, written in question-and-answer format.

Living amid the fractious religious upheaval that ensued following the Protestant Reformation, Ursinus was in the vanguard of theologians and Christian authors in Germany. The newly-established Reformed church wished to cement its influence among the populace; to this end, authors wrote and published a series of books that answered queries on faith. The Heidelberg Catechism was one of the most influential, gaining a wide readership and proving vital to the establishment of Protestantism, with its organized composition of 52 Lord's Days - one for each week of the year - allowing for ease of teaching.

Ursinus's explanations are cogent, setting out principles of Christianity by answering a variety of questions on subjects such as Jesus Christ, baptism, sin, forgiveness and salvation. Both the New Testament Gospels and Old Testament lore are examined; of particular note is the author's explanations of Moses' Ten Commandments and their unceasing importance in Christian life. Cultural questions are also considered; the role of the church in society, and the ceremonies that believers participate in. There are notable allusions to the ongoing hostilities of his time; Ursinus occasionally makes derogatory references to the Catholic church, referring to its believers as a 'Popish mass'.

  Read Full Product Description
 
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
This item is Non-Returnable.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 2 copies from $22.11
 
 
 
 

More About The Commentary of Zacharias Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism by Zacharias Ursinus; G. W. Williard

 
 
 

Overview

Zacharias Ursinus was a Reformed Christian theologian who authored the Heidelberg Catechism, an early Protestant document about faith, written in question-and-answer format.

Living amid the fractious religious upheaval that ensued following the Protestant Reformation, Ursinus was in the vanguard of theologians and Christian authors in Germany. The newly-established Reformed church wished to cement its influence among the populace; to this end, authors wrote and published a series of books that answered queries on faith. The Heidelberg Catechism was one of the most influential, gaining a wide readership and proving vital to the establishment of Protestantism, with its organized composition of 52 Lord's Days - one for each week of the year - allowing for ease of teaching.

Ursinus's explanations are cogent, setting out principles of Christianity by answering a variety of questions on subjects such as Jesus Christ, baptism, sin, forgiveness and salvation. Both the New Testament Gospels and Old Testament lore are examined; of particular note is the author's explanations of Moses' Ten Commandments and their unceasing importance in Christian life. Cultural questions are also considered; the role of the church in society, and the ceremonies that believers participate in. There are notable allusions to the ongoing hostilities of his time; Ursinus occasionally makes derogatory references to the Catholic church, referring to its believers as a 'Popish mass'.



This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781789871975
  • ISBN-10: 1789871972
  • Publisher: Pantianos Classics
  • Publish Date: January 1888
  • Page Count: 668
  • Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.47 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.13 pounds


Related Categories

 

BAM Customer Reviews