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Eats, Shoots & Leaves : Why, Commas Really Do Make a Difference!
by Lynne Truss and Bonnie Timmons




Overview -
Illuminating the comical confusion the lowly comma can cause, this new edition uses lively, subversive illustrations to show how misplacing or leaving out a comma can change the meaning of a sentence completely. This picture book adaptation of the "New York Times" bestseller is sure to elicit gales of laughter--and better punctuation--from all who read it.

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More About Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss; Bonnie Timmons

 
 
 

Overview

Illuminating the comical confusion the lowly comma can cause, this new edition uses lively, subversive illustrations to show how misplacing or leaving out a comma can change the meaning of a sentence completely. This picture book adaptation of the "New York Times" bestseller is sure to elicit gales of laughter--and better punctuation--from all who read it.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399244919
  • ISBN-10: 0399244913
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers
  • Publish Date: August 2006
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 6-9
  • Dimensions: 7.26 x 10.8 x 0.41 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.69 pounds


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BookPage Reviews

A punctuation primer for the younger set

Already a best-selling sensation on both sides of the Atlantic for her impassioned views on punctuation—memorably expressed in the hilarious comma-laden rant, Eats, Shoots & Leaves—British author Lynne Truss now trains her sights on younger writers, who (goodness knows) could use some help in mastering proper use of the English language. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves: Why, Commas Really do Make a Difference!, Truss simplifies her subject by zeroing in on that most troublesome of punctuation marks, the lowly comma. Using Bonnie Timmons' cartoons to catch the attention of her audience (ages 6 and up), the author demonstrates the dire consequences of misplacing or—oh, the horror!—omitting a needed comma. "Commas can create havoc when they are left out or are put in the wrong spot, and the results of misuse can be hilarious," Truss writes. Readers can see, for example, the two entirely different meanings of a sentence with commas included ("The student, said the teacher, is crazy.") and the same sentence without commas ("The student said the teacher is crazy.") Truss includes a section at the back of the book to explain how and why commas are appropriately used, introducing more complex grammatical concepts such as independent clauses and modifiers. English teachers everywhere will be forever in her debt.

 

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