menu

The Ego and His Own : A Masterpiece on Western Philosophy
by Max Stirner and Steven T. Byington




Overview -

The Ego and Its Own is an 1844 work by German philosopher Max Stirner. It presents a radically nominalist and individualist critique of, on the one hand, Christianity, nationalism and traditional morality, and on the other, humanism, utilitarianism, liberalism and much of the then-burgeoning socialist movement, advocating instead an amoral (although importantly not inherently immoral or antisocial) egoism.

Stirner believed that there was no objective social reality independent of the individual; social classes, the state, the masses, and humanity are abstractions and therefore need not be considered seriously. He wrote of a finite, empirical ego, which he saw as the motive force of every human action. Writing chiefly for working-class readers, he taught that all persons are capable of the self-awareness that would make them "egoists," or true individuals.

Max Stirner in his book The Ego and His Own (1845) recommended, instead of social reform, a ruthless individualism that should seek satisfaction by any means and at whatever risk. A small group of other individualists.

  Read Full Product Description
 
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
This item is Non-Returnable.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 3 copies from $26.49
 
Download

Format: EPUB What's this?
This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

More About The Ego and His Own by Max Stirner; Steven T. Byington

 
 
 

Overview

The Ego and Its Own is an 1844 work by German philosopher Max Stirner. It presents a radically nominalist and individualist critique of, on the one hand, Christianity, nationalism and traditional morality, and on the other, humanism, utilitarianism, liberalism and much of the then-burgeoning socialist movement, advocating instead an amoral (although importantly not inherently immoral or antisocial) egoism.

Stirner believed that there was no objective social reality independent of the individual; social classes, the state, the masses, and humanity are abstractions and therefore need not be considered seriously. He wrote of a finite, empirical ego, which he saw as the motive force of every human action. Writing chiefly for working-class readers, he taught that all persons are capable of the self-awareness that would make them "egoists," or true individuals.

Max Stirner in his book The Ego and His Own (1845) recommended, instead of social reform, a ruthless individualism that should seek satisfaction by any means and at whatever risk. A small group of other individualists.



This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9786057748492
  • ISBN-10: 6057748492
  • Publisher: E-Kitap Projesi & Cheapest Books
  • Publish Date: September 1844
  • Page Count: 416
  • Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.06 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.68 pounds


Related Categories

 

BAM Customer Reviews