menu

A Good American Family : The Red Scare and My Father
by David Maraniss




Overview -
Pulitzer Prize-winning author and "one of our most talented biographers and historians" (The New York Times) David Maraniss delivers a "thoughtful, poignant, and historically valuable story of the Red Scare of the 1950s" (The Wall Street Journal) through the chilling yet affirming story of his family's ordeal, from blacklisting to vindication.

Elliott Maraniss, David's father, a WWII veteran who had commanded an all-black company in the Pacific, was spied on by the FBI, named as a communist by an informant, called before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952, fired from his newspaper job, and blacklisted for five years. Yet he never lost faith in America and emerged on the other side with his family and optimism intact.

In a sweeping drama that moves from the Depression and Spanish Civil War to the HUAC hearings and end of the McCarthy era, Maraniss weaves his father's story through the lives of his inquisitors and defenders as they struggle with the vital 20th-century issues of race, fascism, communism, and first amendment freedoms. "Remarkably balanced, forthright, and unwavering in its search for the truth" (The New York Times), A Good American Family evokes the political dysfunctions of the 1950s while underscoring what it really means to be an American. It is "clear-eyed and empathetic" (Publishers Weekly, starred review) tribute from a brilliant writer to his father and the family he protected in dangerous times.

  Read Full Product Description
 
local_shippingFor Delivery
On Order. Usually ships in 2-4 weeks
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 58 copies from $3.50
 
Download

Format: EPUB What's this?
This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

Customers Also Bought

More About A Good American Family by David Maraniss

 
 
 

Overview

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and "one of our most talented biographers and historians" (The New York Times) David Maraniss delivers a "thoughtful, poignant, and historically valuable story of the Red Scare of the 1950s" (The Wall Street Journal) through the chilling yet affirming story of his family's ordeal, from blacklisting to vindication.

Elliott Maraniss, David's father, a WWII veteran who had commanded an all-black company in the Pacific, was spied on by the FBI, named as a communist by an informant, called before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952, fired from his newspaper job, and blacklisted for five years. Yet he never lost faith in America and emerged on the other side with his family and optimism intact.

In a sweeping drama that moves from the Depression and Spanish Civil War to the HUAC hearings and end of the McCarthy era, Maraniss weaves his father's story through the lives of his inquisitors and defenders as they struggle with the vital 20th-century issues of race, fascism, communism, and first amendment freedoms. "Remarkably balanced, forthright, and unwavering in its search for the truth" (The New York Times), A Good American Family evokes the political dysfunctions of the 1950s while underscoring what it really means to be an American. It is "clear-eyed and empathetic" (Publishers Weekly, starred review) tribute from a brilliant writer to his father and the family he protected in dangerous times.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781501178399
  • ISBN-10: 1501178393
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publish Date: November 2020
  • Page Count: 432
  • Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 pounds


Related Categories

 

BookPage Reviews

Book Clubs: November 2020

Four memoirs explore family tensions and long-held secrets that ripple across generations.

Acclaimed memoirist Dani Shapiro was very close to her father, Paul, who died when she was 23. After a DNA test revealed that Paul wasn’t her real father, Shapiro’s world was turned upside down. In Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love, Shapiro writes about searching for her biological father, who donated sperm to a clinic that her parents visited for fertility treatments. It’s an electrifying story, and Shapiro uses it as a springboard into explorations of identity and selfhood, family ties and the human need for closure. Honest, tender and moving, her memoir combines a stranger-than-fiction plotline with insights readers will savor.

Ariana Neumann provides a riveting account of her Jewish family’s experiences during World War II and the extraordinary life of her father, Hans Neumann, in When Time Stopped: A Memoir of My Father’s War and What Remains. Hans spied for the Allies in Berlin before going on to make his fortune in Venezuela as an industrialist, but the author didn’t learn about Hans’ past until after his death. Her book is at once a suspenseful tale of survival and a poignant tribute to her father.

In A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father, David Maraniss tells the story of his father, Elliott Maraniss, who led a unit of Black soldiers during World War II and was accused of being a communist in the 1950s. Maraniss was under FBI surveillance and was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, losing his journalism job as a result. In crafting a moving narrative of his father’s life during an era of fear, the author explores themes of patriotism and loyalty, racism and activism. He blends history with personal narrative to create a richly rewarding memoir.

Megan Phelps-Roper came of age in the conservative Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas. As a zealous member of the congregation, she opposed homosexuality, espoused anti-Semitic views and became known for engaging critics on Twitter. But after her viewpoints shifted, she broke away from the church, a journey she documents in Unfollow: A Memoir of Loving and Leaving Extremism. Phelps-Roper writes with unflinching honesty about questioning long-held beliefs and the process of building a new life. Book clubs will encounter substantial topics for discussion in her courageous, hopeful narrative.

 

BAM Customer Reviews