menu

Jonathan Strange & MR Norrell
by Susanna Clarke




Overview -

In the Hugo-award winning, epic New York Times Bestseller and basis for the BBC miniseries, two men change England's history when they bring magic back into the world.

In the midst of the Napoleonic Wars in 1806, most people believe magic to have long since disappeared from England - until the reclusive Mr. Norrell reveals his powers and becomes an overnight celebrity.

Yet the cautious, fussy Norrell is challenged by the emergence of another magician, the brilliant novice Jonathan Strange. Young, handsome, and daring, Strange is the very opposite of Norrell. He becomes Norrell's student, and they join forces in the war against France. But Strange is increasingly drawn to the wildest, most perilous forms of magic, straining his partnership with Norrell, and putting at risk everything else he holds dear.

Susanna Clarke's brilliant first novel is an utterly compelling epic tale of nineteenth-century England and the two magicians who, first as teacher and pupil and then as rivals, emerge to change its history.

  Read Full Product Description
 
Paperback
  • Retail Price: $19.00
  • $16.65
    (Save 12%)
Add to Cart
+ Add to Wishlist
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 89 copies from $4.89
 
Download

Format: EPUB What's this?
This item is available only to U.S. and Canada billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

Customers Also Bought

More About Jonathan Strange & MR Norrell by Susanna Clarke

 
 
 

Overview

In the Hugo-award winning, epic New York Times Bestseller and basis for the BBC miniseries, two men change England's history when they bring magic back into the world.

In the midst of the Napoleonic Wars in 1806, most people believe magic to have long since disappeared from England - until the reclusive Mr. Norrell reveals his powers and becomes an overnight celebrity.

Yet the cautious, fussy Norrell is challenged by the emergence of another magician, the brilliant novice Jonathan Strange. Young, handsome, and daring, Strange is the very opposite of Norrell. He becomes Norrell's student, and they join forces in the war against France. But Strange is increasingly drawn to the wildest, most perilous forms of magic, straining his partnership with Norrell, and putting at risk everything else he holds dear.

Susanna Clarke's brilliant first novel is an utterly compelling epic tale of nineteenth-century England and the two magicians who, first as teacher and pupil and then as rivals, emerge to change its history.


 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582346038
  • ISBN-10: 1582346038
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publish Date: September 2005
  • Page Count: 846
  • Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 2.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds


Related Categories

 

BookPage Reviews

Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

Ten years in the making, Clarke's playful debut novel is a beguiling mix of history and fantasy that brings to mind some of the best British novelists, including Jane Austen and Charles Dickens, and—best of all—introduces a good old-fashioned magician. The novel opens in 1808, in the midst of the Napoleonic Wars. Mr. Norrell, a scholarly gent from Yorkshire who is an expert in the supernatural lore of England, has mastered the magic of the faeries and become a celebrity in his native land. His powers are so advanced, in fact, that he is able to raise a woman from the dead. At the urging of the British government, Mr. Norrell relocates to London, where he puts his powers to use by assisting with the war, and he is soon engineering illusions like an 11-day barricade of France by means of English ships created out of rainwater. His young pupil, an aristocrat named Jonathan Strange, has also become a proficient magician, but his ideas about the uses of enchantment differ from those of his teacher, and the pair's ideological divergence eventually leads to conflict. In the end, Strange's headlong and impulsive use of his powers threatens to bring about his own destruction. Clarke uses some excellent narrative devices to authenticate her tale; there are footnotes throughout, and she employs the vernacular of the 19th century. This wonderfully compelling novel, which was named the 2005 Book Sense Book of the Year in fiction, is a surprise sensation that lives up to its reputation.

A reading group guide is available online at www.bloomsburyusa.com.

 

BAM Customer Reviews