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{ "item_title" : "Our Favorite African Adrinkra Symbols", "item_author" : [" Abena Walker "], "item_description" : "Our Favorite African Adrinkra Symbols is a coloring book with drawings of the Symbols, poems for each of the Seven Principles of the Nguzo Saba, and Learning Activities for children and adults.To Our Children's Parents and Teachers Symbology is a sacred aspect of African culture, spirituality and art, and this is reflected in the traditional African system of educating/parenting. Children grow up learning through the use and understanding of relationships, analogies, harmonies and symbolic imagery and as a result, their creative genius and intuition (an important aspect of African intelligence) are stimulated and developed. At the African Learning Center, we use symbols from the entire African continent, and we have been inspired especially by the Adinkra symbols of Ghana. They are an integral part of our character-building program which helps children relate to each other, and their elders. Adinkra is a type of cloth which was originally woven on narrow looms by the Akan people of Ghana. The word Adinkra means farewell or good-bye and traditionally the cloth was worn at funerals in honor of the departed ones and to encourage them on the path of spiritual development. The symbols, which were stamped into the cloth, contained messages which included names of historical events and persons, proverbs, familiar objects and cultural concepts. Today, Adinkra cloth is worn for a variety of special occasions including weddings, birthday celebrations, and naming ceremonies. Our children internalize and utilize the sixty symbols included in the pamphlet, The Language of Adinkra Patterns, by A.K. Quarcoo, 1972. We have chosen seventeen for this coloring book. The literal translations and explanations from the pamphlet are included as well as poems reflecting not only the symbols, but also their relationship to the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles of Blackness; Umoja - Unity; Kujiamulia - Self-Determination; Ujima - Collective Work and Responsibility; Ujamaa - Cooperative Economics; Nia - Purpose; Uumbaji - Creativity; and lmani - Faith. The Nguzo Saba was developed by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga based on his study of African culture and the value system of traditional African society. These principles form the foundation of Kwanzaa, the increasingly popular holiday among Africans in America, which is celebrated from December 26 to January 1. Kwanzaa was started by Dr. Karenga in 1966 and has its roots in the traditional African celebrations of the harvest and the fruits of communal labor. These celebrations were times of thanksgiving and purification; of ritualization, revitalization, and regeneration. The Nguzo Saba and the Adinkra symbols, reflections of the wisdom of our ancestors, give us direction throughout the year. Today, the Adinkra symbols inspire us to be strong and positive. Their wisdom, optimism, faith and love engender within us a deep appreciation of Africa, and the humanity and spiritual depth of African people. Peace and Love, Abena Walker, Director The African Learning Center", "item_img_path" : "https://covers3.booksamillion.com/covers/bam/1/69/886/062/1698860625_b.jpg", "price_data" : { "retail_price" : "15.00", "online_price" : "15.00", "our_price" : "15.00", "club_price" : "15.00", "savings_pct" : "0", "savings_amt" : "0.00", "club_savings_pct" : "0", "club_savings_amt" : "0.00", "discount_pct" : "10", "store_price" : "" } }
Our Favorite African Adrinkra Symbols|Abena Walker
Our Favorite African Adrinkra Symbols : A Coloring Book
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Overview

Our Favorite African Adrinkra Symbols is a coloring book with drawings of the Symbols, poems for each of the Seven Principles of the Nguzo Saba, and Learning Activities for children and adults.To Our Children's Parents and Teachers Symbology is a sacred aspect of African culture, spirituality and art, and this is reflected in the traditional African system of educating/parenting. Children grow up learning through the use and understanding of relationships, analogies, harmonies and symbolic imagery and as a result, their creative genius and intuition (an important aspect of African intelligence) are stimulated and developed. At the African Learning Center, we use symbols from the entire African continent, and we have been inspired especially by the Adinkra symbols of Ghana. They are an integral part of our character-building program which helps children relate to each other, and their elders. Adinkra is a type of cloth which was originally woven on narrow looms by the Akan people of Ghana. The word Adinkra means "farewell or good-bye" and traditionally the cloth was worn at funerals in honor of the departed ones and to encourage them on the path of spiritual development. The symbols, which were stamped into the cloth, contained messages which included names of historical events and persons, proverbs, familiar objects and cultural concepts. Today, Adinkra cloth is worn for a variety of special occasions including weddings, birthday celebrations, and naming ceremonies. Our children internalize and utilize the sixty symbols included in the pamphlet, The Language of Adinkra Patterns, by A.K. Quarcoo, 1972. We have chosen seventeen for this coloring book. The literal translations and explanations from the pamphlet are included as well as poems reflecting not only the symbols, but also their relationship to the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles of Blackness; Umoja - Unity; Kujiamulia - Self-Determination; Ujima - Collective Work and Responsibility; Ujamaa - Cooperative Economics; Nia - Purpose; Uumbaji - Creativity; and lmani - Faith. The Nguzo Saba was developed by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga based on his study of African culture and the value system of traditional African society. These principles form the foundation of Kwanzaa, the increasingly popular holiday among Africans in America, which is celebrated from December 26 to January 1. Kwanzaa was started by Dr. Karenga in 1966 and has its roots in the traditional African celebrations of the harvest and the fruits of communal labor. These celebrations were times of thanksgiving and purification; of ritualization, revitalization, and regeneration. The Nguzo Saba and the Adinkra symbols, reflections of the wisdom of our ancestors, give us direction throughout the year. Today, the Adinkra symbols inspire us to be strong and positive. Their wisdom, optimism, faith and love engender within us a deep appreciation of Africa, and the humanity and spiritual depth of African people. Peace and Love, Abena Walker, Director The African Learning Center

This item is Non-Returnable

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781698860626
  • ISBN-10: 1698860625
  • Publisher: Independently Published
  • Publish Date: October 2019
  • Dimensions: 11.02 x 8.5 x 0.08 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.26 pounds
  • Page Count: 40

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