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Procrastibaking : 100 Recipes for Getting Nothing Done in the Most Delicious Way Possible
by Erin Gardner




Overview -
"The delicious distraction we need these days." --The New York Times

Whether you need a distraction, a treat, or just a break from your responsibilities, beloved blogger Erin Gardner's enticing collection of 100 recipes is here to provide a delicious diversion.

Sometimes you need to take a mini vacation from the demands of daily life, and the kitchen is the best space for it. How can you return those emails when there's dough on your hands? It would be counterproductive to handle clean laundry after dipping chocolates all afternoon, right? Whether you're avoiding work, the news, or just trying to keep your hands busy, baking offers the perfect escape.

Pastry chef and beloved blogger Erin Gardner provides the ultimate guide to procrastibaking with pride and purpose in this inspired collection of 100 recipes, from easy one-hour projects to weekend affairs. From Case-of-the-Mondays Morning Treats, to Late-for-Everything Loaf Cakes and Fear-of-Success Snack Cakes, this book has a chapter for every procrastibaking need, and recipes to satisfy any craving for distraction. Not feeling that work project? Work on some Peanut Butter S'more Bars instead. Term paper due tomorrow? Making some No-Bake Cookies-n-Cream Pie will get the creative juices flowing. Does your mother-in-law have you channeling Scrooge? This calls for a procrasti-masterpiece, like a Gingerbread House...from scratch.

So don't worry. Put down the cleaning supplies. Ignore the emails. Treat yourself to a happiness break.

It's time to procrastibake.

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More About Procrastibaking by Erin Gardner

 
 
 

Overview

"The delicious distraction we need these days." --The New York Times

Whether you need a distraction, a treat, or just a break from your responsibilities, beloved blogger Erin Gardner's enticing collection of 100 recipes is here to provide a delicious diversion.

Sometimes you need to take a mini vacation from the demands of daily life, and the kitchen is the best space for it. How can you return those emails when there's dough on your hands? It would be counterproductive to handle clean laundry after dipping chocolates all afternoon, right? Whether you're avoiding work, the news, or just trying to keep your hands busy, baking offers the perfect escape.

Pastry chef and beloved blogger Erin Gardner provides the ultimate guide to procrastibaking with pride and purpose in this inspired collection of 100 recipes, from easy one-hour projects to weekend affairs. From Case-of-the-Mondays Morning Treats, to Late-for-Everything Loaf Cakes and Fear-of-Success Snack Cakes, this book has a chapter for every procrastibaking need, and recipes to satisfy any craving for distraction. Not feeling that work project? Work on some Peanut Butter S'more Bars instead. Term paper due tomorrow? Making some No-Bake Cookies-n-Cream Pie will get the creative juices flowing. Does your mother-in-law have you channeling Scrooge? This calls for a procrasti-masterpiece, like a Gingerbread House...from scratch.

So don't worry. Put down the cleaning supplies. Ignore the emails. Treat yourself to a happiness break.

It's time to procrastibake.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781982117740
  • ISBN-10: 1982117745
  • Publisher: Atria Books
  • Publish Date: March 2020
  • Page Count: 224
  • Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.35 pounds


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BookPage Reviews

Lifestyles: April 2020

Whether you want to be educated, inspired or deliciously distracted, these releases can help.


ā˜… Earth Almanac

The internet’s useful and all, but have you picked up an almanac lately? Ken Keffer’s Earth Almanac is a fine specimen, focused on phenology, the interconnection of living things through seasonal change. Each of its 365 entries explores a particular natural creature, phenomenon or feature; on the day of this writing, Keffer looks closely at the “twittering flights of the American woodcock,” aka bog sucker, mud bat or brush snipe. Beautifully illustrated, Earth Almanac makes a delightful daily read-aloud with family. Keffer’s generalist approach offers encouragement to budding naturalists, inviting us to action as field data collectors and advocates for the earth. “People are more likely to protect what they are familiar with and what they care about,” he writes.

How to Be an Artist

In 2018, Jerry Saltz, senior art critic for New York magazine, wrote a piece on how to live more creatively, featuring 33 “nodes and nubs of advice.” It proved wildly popular, so Saltz kept going, thinking more deeply about how to make art a part of one’s life—and what is art, anyway? The result is the trim, brilliant How to Be an Artist, which combines color reproductions of famous works with inspiring directives, pep talks and juicy reflections on art-making and sustainable creative practice. Whether you’re a proud amateur or a frustrated expert, these are words worth taking to heart. Saltz’s knowledge veins run deep, and his voice is crisp, frank, intimate and urgent. 

Procrastibaking

As I polish off this column a day past my deadline, you can bet that I’m loving a new cookbook with chapter headings like “Better-Late-Than-Never Brownies and Bars,” “Late-for-Everything Loaf Cakes” and “Sorry-for-the-Delayed-Response Savory Bakes.” This is Erin Gardner’s Procrastibaking, and it is giving me life. Never mind that I absolutely want to try every delicious-sounding recipe, of which there are more than 100, and most of which are making a successful appeal to my sweet tooth. I also want to nail the word search, mazes and other games that are sprinkled throughout the book like finishing sugar. But first I must finish this column . . . or must Iā€Š? After all, the majority of these treats can be turned out in under 50 minutes, I’m told.

 

BAM Customer Reviews