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The Ringer
Johnny Knoxville and Brian Cox




Overview -
Peter and Bobby Farrelly have always expressed an especially warm but unsentimental attitude in their films toward those with disabilities, most notably in THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT MARY and SHALLOW HAL. THE RINGER, which they produced (but neither wrote nor directed), takes this trait to feverish new heights. JACKASS-cum-leading man stars Johnny Knoxville as office schmo Steve Barker, whose request for more responsibility at his job indirectly results in the severing of four fingers from the hand of Stavi, the mild-mannered office janitor. When Steve requests financial help from his morally-questionable gambling addict Uncle Gary (Brian Cox), Stevie finds himself posing as "Jeffy" an athlete in the Special Olympics whose victory against track champion Jimmy (Leonard Flowers) could spell an end to Uncle Gary's debts and the reattaching of Stavi's fingers. Though a basic description of its premise would make most viewers cry foul, THE RINGER skirts the obvious charge of exploitation by making the mentally challenged characters the only ones to realize that Steve is only acting handicapped. Steve's fellow Olympians are cast with a combination of veteran character actors and real-life former Special Olympians (most notably Edward Barbanell, John Taylor, and Leonard Flowers) who, while lending the film authenticity, also spark with comic timing and the true joy of being on camera. Knoxville once again makes an affable hero, and Ricky Blitt's screenplay, while crass by nature, keeps true vulgarity at bay in favor of a good nature that makes simplicity an asset.

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DVD (New Box Art)
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More About The Ringer

 
 
 

Overview

Peter and Bobby Farrelly have always expressed an especially warm but unsentimental attitude in their films toward those with disabilities, most notably in THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT MARY and SHALLOW HAL. THE RINGER, which they produced (but neither wrote nor directed), takes this trait to feverish new heights. JACKASS-cum-leading man stars Johnny Knoxville as office schmo Steve Barker, whose request for more responsibility at his job indirectly results in the severing of four fingers from the hand of Stavi, the mild-mannered office janitor. When Steve requests financial help from his morally-questionable gambling addict Uncle Gary (Brian Cox), Stevie finds himself posing as "Jeffy" an athlete in the Special Olympics whose victory against track champion Jimmy (Leonard Flowers) could spell an end to Uncle Gary's debts and the reattaching of Stavi's fingers. Though a basic description of its premise would make most viewers cry foul, THE RINGER skirts the obvious charge of exploitation by making the mentally challenged characters the only ones to realize that Steve is only acting handicapped. Steve's fellow Olympians are cast with a combination of veteran character actors and real-life former Special Olympians (most notably Edward Barbanell, John Taylor, and Leonard Flowers) who, while lending the film authenticity, also spark with comic timing and the true joy of being on camera. Knoxville once again makes an affable hero, and Ricky Blitt's screenplay, while crass by nature, keeps true vulgarity at bay in favor of a good nature that makes simplicity an asset.

Main Cast & Crew

Barry W. Blaustein - Director
Johnny Knoxville
Brian Cox
Katherine Heigl
Camille Chen
Steven Prince
Brad Leland
Zen Gesner
Edward Barbanell

 

Details

DVD Format
  • Format: DVD (New Box Art)
  • Run Time: 100
  • Color Format: Color
  • UPC: 024543235231
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Rating: PG-13 (MPAA) (Crude and sexual humor, drug references, and language)
  • Release Date: May 2006

Related Categories:
Movies > Comedies

Related Keywords:
Mistaken Identity
Theatrical Release
Gambling
Friendships
Money

 

Movie Reviews

More Details

Notes:
Theatrical Release: December 23, 2005

Reviews:
"[T]hough the movie bears some of the Farrellys' trademark outrageous humor, it has a sweet demeanor and makes a noble statement." - 12/23/2005 Los Angeles Times, p.E7


"[A] film that does for the mentally challenged what REVENGE OF THE NERDS did for the pocket-protector set, finding a hidden coolness in their ability to be themselves." -- Grade: B - 01/13/2006 Entertainment Weekly, p.56


"[T]here is a sweet and rather sentimental story arc." - 05/01/2006 Sight and Sound, p.66

 

BAM Customer Reviews