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Recent Social Trends in France, 1960-1990
by Michel Forsé and Jean-Pierre Jaslin




Overview -

Over the three decades from 1960 to 1990, French society underwent a spectacular transformation due to the baby boom, which was particularly broad-based and prolonged in France and caused the population to climb by a full one-third. At the same time, the French economy expanded and the pace of modernization picked up, with the result that the wealth of the French quadrupled in a single generation. The turning point between the reconstruction and development period and the period of profound social change appears to have been 1965. The baby boom was over by then, and the production system was shifting in orientation. No longer dominated by the growth of basic industries, production was now starting to focus on consumer goods and services.

A prominent feature of the social revolution in France has been the decline of the great national institutions — the Republic, the Army, the church, and the schools — which are losing their symbolic value and are no longer the targets of ideological disputes. As a result, there is a growing basic consensus among the French people. At the same time, the French have developed a new interest in managing local problems — due to the decentralization law — which has led to the establishment of many voluntary associations.

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More About Recent Social Trends in France, 1960-1990 by Michel Forsé; Jean-Pierre Jaslin

 
 
 

Overview

Over the three decades from 1960 to 1990, French society underwent a spectacular transformation due to the baby boom, which was particularly broad-based and prolonged in France and caused the population to climb by a full one-third. At the same time, the French economy expanded and the pace of modernization picked up, with the result that the wealth of the French quadrupled in a single generation. The turning point between the reconstruction and development period and the period of profound social change appears to have been 1965. The baby boom was over by then, and the production system was shifting in orientation. No longer dominated by the growth of basic industries, production was now starting to focus on consumer goods and services.

A prominent feature of the social revolution in France has been the decline of the great national institutions — the Republic, the Army, the church, and the schools — which are losing their symbolic value and are no longer the targets of ideological disputes. As a result, there is a growing basic consensus among the French people. At the same time, the French have developed a new interest in managing local problems — due to the decentralization law — which has led to the establishment of many voluntary associations.


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Details

  • ISBN: 9780773563230
  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
  • Date: Oct 2012
 

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